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An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1931-1940

A certain expansiveness covers the days of peace before World War II. For those with a background in Old and Middle English, some of the grand old texts (which so few seem to read any more) crop up, such as the Awntyrs of Arthur, and the old familiar names of scholars appear as flesh and blood associated with the work of the Society: Bruce Dickins, E.V. Gordon, W.W.Skeat, to name but a few. And the Compiler feels that some of the dialect is very strange, even more incomprehensible, without assistance, than some from the later periods. In the practical field, it is not always clear which issue of the Transactions belongs to which year: for instance, the Transactions published November 1935 appear to cover the period 1934/5; this issue is numbered {Part XXXVI Volume V}. Likewise, the Transactions for 1935 did not appear until November 1936 – these are numbered {Part XXXVII Volume V}. The Transactions for 1940 {Part XLI. Volume VI} did not appear until April 1941, and the contents are therefore listed in the index for 1941-1950 as well as in the present index, 1931 – 40.

A technical note for those who use certain technologies: phonetic (IPA) transcriptions, which were made much use of at this period, need to be rendered in a font which includes the appropriate symbols – I have transcribed them myself using “Microsoft Sans Serif”, thus: (a:tsluft). A special effort may need to be made to show these IPA symbols as given by the authors.

ABE CLEGG – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

ABERCROMBIE, Professor LASCELLES, Life member of Y.D.S., death reported. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 5.

ABLAUT THE KITTEN – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

Advert for: A Bo’ddin o’ Cowls, by Arthur Stanley Umpleby “Verses in the Cleveland Dialect”. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 60.

Advert for: York Minster Screen (Yorkshire Dialect Society Reprints) 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 61; 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 91.

Advert for: Gramophone records of Yorkshire Dialect (Y.D.S.): Baildon, Cowling, Driffield, Scarbro’ & Whitby, Sheffield, Staithes. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 75; 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 92.

Advert for: The Dialect Comedies of F. Austin Hyde (Year Book Press, Museum St., London W.C.1), Safe Custody, Honest Folk, Stratagems, The Ship Comes In, First Aid, A Bit of Help, The Tyrant, Maker of Highways (“a serious play”), Four White Socks, Spanish Wine. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 93.

Advert for: Dialect Poems and Prose, by Thomas Blackah of Greenhow Hill, and T’Miners by Harald John Lexow Bruff (Waddingtons, York). 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 74; 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 94.

ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

AMPLEFORTH FOLK PLAY – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

Anonymous, Buryin’ Brass. A prose piece in dialect. “Ah’ll stritch me-sel oot on’t bed i’t’cooarner there, an’ thoo mun dust me feeace wi’ flooar…an’ darken t’winder a bit, an’ then off wi tha ti awd Jooasaph’s up at t’Hall, an mak as lang a feeace as tha can, an’ tell him ah’se deead, an’ thoo hezn’t a hawpny i’t’hoose ti bury ma wiv.” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 65-68.

Austin Hyde, F. – see Hyde, F. Austin.

Awntyrs of Arthure – passim in review 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 42-43.

BAINBRIDGE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

Barbier, Paul (Professor of French, Leeds University), Dialect. According to his argument, Brigantes, Parisii, Gallo-Romans and Norsemen who had learnt Irish account for the Celtic element in Yorkshire, Latin and post-Conquest French for the Italic, and Angles and Danes for the Germanic element. 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 10-14.

BILL O’ TH’ HOYLES END – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Binnell, Mrs Geraldine B., Three Kisses. Poem in dialect, part of dialect competition.
She lay there lapt i’t peace o’ death.
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 38.

Binnall, Geraldine, Royalty i’ t’ Dale. Poem in dialect.
But, howsomivver, theer I stood, t’owd saucepan in my hand,
And talked o’ ducks and cherry trees wi the King of all the Land!
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 49.

BINNS, ISAAC – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

BLACKAH, THOMAS, dialect writer. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 74; 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 94.

Blackah, Thomas, Cum Don on thi’ Bonnet and Shawl. Poem in dialect.
….we can sit wer sens doon,
On’t craggs close a’t side a’t becksteead.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 52.

BLACKAMORE (N. E. Yorkshire). 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 31-35.

BONE, Miss FLORENCE, writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

BRADFORD DIALECT (“Northern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Branston, R.V., The Dialect of Denby Dale. “Yon’s t’cloise [field] wheere t’big pawoi [pie] wor. Theere wor three whawl sheep an’ a cawf e wun pawoi. What wor it for? Whawoi [Why], rejoicin’ at Corn Bill sumin’ off e [18]’46.
(askinz), (spərinz) – banns of marriage
(a:tsluft) – dumbfounded
(le:k) – to be unemployed, on the dole
(muə ̭tlɛət nə dinə) – more waste than eating”
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 18-27.

BRUFF, H.J.L. (Hon. Secretary and Treasurer of Y.D.S.) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

Bruff, Harold, Secretary’s Report. “One ought to consider that with reference to the English language it is our duty to the memory of our fore-elders…that the remains of the ancient dialects which went to make up modern English should be recorded.” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 5-13.

Bruff, H.J.L., Our First Constitution. The Constitution of the Y.D.S. of 1897, together with a list of the members at that time. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 35-38.

Bruff, Harald J.L., Hon. Secretary’s Report. “…One public meeting, called with some doubt, as it was thought that travelling difficulties and the black-out might prevent members from attending.”(1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941}

CAM HOUSES, WHARFEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

CARTER, F.A. writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

Carter, F.A., Aat i-Walkin’. Poem in West Riding dialect, part of dialect competition.
I whistle t’ dog to follow,
An’ set me pipe aleet.
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 29-31.

CLEGG, ABE – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

CLEVELAND DIALECT (“N. and E. parts of North Riding, of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} ; 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 60.

CLEVELAND DIALECT DICTIONARY (A. Pearse). 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 8.

CLOCK ALMANACK. – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13; 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 27-28.

CODEX RUSHWORTHIANUS. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 11-25.

COLNE VALLEY DIALECT – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Comparative Grammar of the Indo-Germanic Languages (Brugmann) – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

CONSTITUTION “Y.D.S. Proposed Rules, Constitution and Standing Orders” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 47-55.

CONSTITUTION OF Y.D.S. – newly formulated. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 8; Copy of 1897 Constitution, together with a list of the members at that time. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 35-38.

CONTENTS OF VOLUMES: Lists from Vol. I, Part V up to the previous issue are given in each issue through the 1930s.

Cowley, W., Emigrant. Poem in dialect.
…t’meean’s as breet
As t’neet ah tthraapsed thi doon bi t’Mill…
1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 56.

Crowther, Sidney H., writing on West Riding (Huddersfield and District) Dialect Drama, in: Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

CUTLERING TERMS. “Yarmouth Beef – or two-eyed beef steak; a red herring, the only beef the poverty stricken cutler could often afford.” 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 28-36.

CUTLERS’ SONG (Sheffield).
Look at it well, it duz excell all t-flatbacks e ahr smitha;
It’s won at o’ve just fooaged uppa Jeffra’s bran new stidda.
1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 26-27.

DALARNE – see SWEDISH DIALECT RESEARCH.

Day Metcalf, W. – see Metcalf, W. Day.

DE MESNILHERMER, ELIAS. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

DENBY DALE DIALECT – see Branston, R.V.

DENTDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

Dewsbra Back o’ t’ Mooin Olmenac an t’ West Ridin’ Historical Calendar (by Mungo Shoddy) – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

DEWSBURY DIALECT (“Northern area – ‘perhaps better in W. area’ – South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} . – compared with Holderness Dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 36-45.

DIALECT CALENDAR. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 9.

DIALECT, USE OF IN DALES, AND BI-LINGUALISM WITH STANDARD ENGLISH. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

DICKINS, Prof. BRUCE – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 12.

Dickins, Bruce, A Yorkshire Chronicler – William of Newburgh. “The importance of William of Newburgh to the study of English and Scandinavian language and literature…” 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

DOMESDAY BOOK, PERSONAL NAMES. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

DONCASTER DIALECT (“Eastern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Dowson, F.W., T’ Awd Mak’ o’ Reead. Poem in dialect.
Ov honest wark they’re doon-reet flaaid,
That’s nut i’ fashion, noo.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 21.

Dowson, F.W., Tiv a Teeafit an’ his Mate. Poem in dialect about a bird (Which?).
Gan back ti hetch yer speckled eggs
Ti brook yer pawms o’ fluff.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 22.

Dowson, F.W. (Member of the Viking Society for Northern Research), Folk Lore of the Plough Stots. “Plough Stots” – “stots” are the young men who drag a plough on their rounds – accompany form of local sword dance (Goathland area), revived by the writer, to which via a manuscript a play or script is attached. Norse origin posited by quoting Olaus Magnus. Also notes on mummers (Cleveland, possibly Gloucestershire), “Fond Pleeaves” (Pickering and Scarborough), Lockton “Tar Barrel”, West Riding “Pace (Easter) Egg”, a folk play from Ampleforth (“rescued by Mr Cecil Sharp”), and West Country Morris Dance routines. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 28-37.

Dowson, F.W., T’Pleeaf Stots (See F.W.Dowson’s article on the Plough Stots folk drama/dance). Poem in dialect.
Sike queer ‘stots,’ an’ actin’ teea,
Sum on t’deearsteean, sum i’t’fleear!
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 45-46.

Dowson, F.W., A Watther Wag-Tail. Poem in dialect concerning a bird Motacilla sp. connected with streams in hill country.
…cooal-black sparklin’ een,
Like bullaces, but breeter.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 53.

Dowson, F.W. Word-Lore, Practices and Beliefs in Blackamore, including an Account of the Lockton “Tar Barrel”. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 31-35.

Dowson, F.W., Gooadlan’ Moorlands. Poem in dialect, about Goathland Moor. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 57-58.

Dowson, F.W., Ah’s Yorksher Lad! Poem in dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 59.

Dowson, F.W. writing on North Riding Dialect Drama, in: Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

Dowson, F.W., Mashelton fra T’Moors. A collection of old phrases from Northeast Yorkshire. “As kahnd as inkle makers – The phrase refers to a couple of old tape makers, sitting and chatting at their work on opposite sides of the great fireplace.” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 59-64.

Dowson, F.W., A Day-Tal Chap. Poem in dialect.
If Ah live whaal next Mart’mas, then eighty Ah’s tonn’d,
An’ still yabble ti fick for mi-sen.
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 77.

DRAMA IN DIALECT – see Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

DUERLEY VALLEY, GAYLE, HAWES. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 19.

DUTCH – see Dyson, B. Ronald, The Sheffield Cutler and his Dialect.

DYKE, Miss WATSON, writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

Dyke, Watson, writing on Wensleydale Dialect Drama, in: Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

Dyson, B. Ronald, The Sheffield Cutler and his Dialect.Essay pp 9-26: “Skilled cutlers from the Netherlands … some of whom … settled in Hallamshire … I began to look … for any words which might have been imported from the Dutch … I worked my way … through a Dutch-English dictionary of … 1735. I found many such words…I was of course doomed to the disappointment I deserved by my unscientific approach. A reference to Old and Middle English gave satisfactory derivations for all the [‘Dutch’ words found]”, Cutler’s Song pp 26-27. Glossary of Sheffield Cutlering Terms pp 28-36. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 9-36.

EAST RIDING AGRICULTURAL TERMS. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 16-30.

EAST WITTON. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

EAST YORKSHIRE DIALECT. 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 37-40.

Editor, Yorkshire Dialect Competition – being announced. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp7-8.

Editor, Dialect Competition. “Over 100 entries were received” Including winning entries, also indexed separately: 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 29 – 40.

English, Brenda H., Nutcrack Night. Poem in dialect. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 56.

English, Brenda H., When Yaffles Yowl. “[Note: The cry of the woodpecker (the bird Dendrocopos sp - Compiler.) or “yaffle” is said to be a sign of rain]” Poem in dialect. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 57.

ENGLISH DIALECT DICTIONARY: “The slips for the letter S alone weighed nearly 2cwt.” – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

Eyrbyggja Saga. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

FARMAN, glossator and scribe, priest at Harewood, nr. Leeds. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 13-14.

FEWSTON & WASHBURN RIVER DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Fitton, Albert, A Pioneer of Aviation. Prose piece in West Riding dialect, part of dialect competition. “Moses went an fetched a haver meyl poooark aht atthaase, an they teed it to his blue smock at back, an t’wind blew it aaht sa as it make him look moor like a gret burd.” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 36-38.

FitzELLIS FAMILY. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

FLEET MOSS PASS. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 15.

FOLKEMINNE AVDELING – in Harold Bruff’s Secretary’s Report 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp5-13.

FOND PLEEAVES – see Dowson, F.R., Folk Lore of the Plough Stots.

GEOFFREY OF MONMOUTH, rightful animadversions on. “Arthur and Merlin are mendacious fictions”. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

GEORDIE, TOWN HEAD, REETH, DIALECT OF. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 20-21.

GHOST STORIES – parallels in Icelandic Saga. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

GLOSSARY OF SHEFFIELD CUTLERING TERMS. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 28-36.

GLOUCESTERSHIRE – POSSIBLE SURVIVAL OF MUMMERS – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

GOODYEAR, R.A.H., writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

GOOLE & MARSHLAND DIALECT (“North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

GORDON, Prof. E.V. – CLASSIFICATION OF YORKSHIRE DIALECTS. map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Grammar of the Dialect of Lorton (Cumberland), A (Börje Brilioth) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Upsala University. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

GOTHIC (language) – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

Grassby, Elsie A., Back End. Poem in dialect.
When t’ harvist’s deean an’ t’ fields is bare,
An’ t’ hosses yoked ti t’ pleeaf yance mair.
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 73.

Grattan, J.H.G., On Slang, Cant and Jargon. “Slang is ‘language on trial’…some of it remains on trial for a very long time… A Dictionary of American Slang [Weseen] … [as if a] glossary to detective and Wild West novels, fails to give much help … [with] the social levels of language…I propose to restrict [the word cant] to secret language…all that is necessary is that [cant words] be employed cryptically…Rhyme-Cant (Rhyming Slang) … rahnd the ’ahses = trahses (trousers) …Jargon is language used outside its proper sphere…” 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 9-22.

GREEN (? Faery) CHILDREN, Woolpit, Suffolk. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

Grettissaga. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

GUNNERSIDE, SWALEDALE. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 20.

H.J.L.B., Barring-Out Day: An Old Nidderdale School Custom. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 69-70.

HACKNESS, WHITBY & N.E.COAST DIALECT (“N. and E. parts of North Riding, of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

HALIFAX DIALECT (“Western area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} . – recording project in abeyance because of World War II. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 6.

HALLAM(SHIRE) – see SHEFFIELD.

HALLIDAY, W.J. (Hon. Editorial Secretary of Y.D.S.) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: The Gone Away, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. “Folk literature at its best.” 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 14-15.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Village Drama Society Plays (published by H.F.W.Deane & Sons). “Excellent series of plays in Yorkshire dialect.” 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 15.

Halliday, W.J., During the Year. Reported the death of Mr. W.E. Haigh “best known for his Glossary of the Huddersfield Dialect.” 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 7-8.

Halliday, W.J., T’ Sperrins. Poem in dialect.
They’ve putten in t’ sperrins, they’re bahn ta be wed.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 18.

Halliday, W.J., Sally. Poem in dialect. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 19-20.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: The Life of Joseph Wright, by Elizabeth Mary Wright (Oxford University Press, 2 volumes). Some of the topics in this essential piece are indexed separately. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: Lillilows, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. Concerns the life of the Dales: “Soa, may I, when thi folk are nigh, / Call thee ‘Thoo’?” (Compare the German custom of dutzen – calling someone du – Compiler.) 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 43-45.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. “The Gorsedd of Wales elected Dorothy Una Ratcliffe .. to be an Honorary Bard … at the Eisteddfod at Wrexham [with] the picturesque title of Cantor Dyffrynnoedd y Gogledd (Singer of the Northern Dales)”. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 7-8.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: Gypsy Dorelia, A Story Play in Three Acts, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 41-42.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: Humours of Village Life, by J. Fairfax-Blakeborough (published by Heath Cranton Ltd). “Dialect can be literature in the hands of a master.” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 42-43.

Halliday, W.J., Review of: ‘Joseph Wright 1855-1930’ by C.H. Firth, in Proceedings of the British Academy Vol. XVIII. London. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 43.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: The Waiting Room, Poems by Irene Petch. “A Yorkshire writer … not in dialect”. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 43-44.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: South African Summer: 5,000 Miles with a Car and Caravan-trailer, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. “This is a jolly book.” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 44-45.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. Mentions Mrs Wright’s book The Story of Joseph Wright, Man and Scholar. 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 7-9.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Rhymes, Verses and Poems from a Yorkshire Loom, by Sir Ben Turner. “There is less straining [in the dialect verses] … fewer echoes from facile rhymesters of days gone by.” 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 28-29.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. “Whilst the greater part of our space must … be devoted to serious and scientific studies … we are particularly desirous of preserving in our pages evidence of the literary vitality of our dialect.” 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 7-8.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Yorkshire Days and Yorkshire Ways, by J. Fairfax-Blakeborough (published by Heath Cranton Ltd). 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} page 41.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Stratagems: A Comedy in One Act, by F. Austin Hyde (Village Drama Society Plays, published by H. F.W. Deane & Sons ). 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} page 42.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. “Added to our list…[a] gramophone record of Goathland dialect..[by] F.W.Dowson. Mr Dyson has expanded his Glossary of the Sheffield Cutler’s dialect…First appearance at Yorkshire Agricultural Show”. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 8-10.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Ryedale. A Report on the District by the Ryedale Branch of the Council for the Preservation of Rural England, edited by C.W.E.Duncombe. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 38-39.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Equatorial Dawn, Travel Letters from North, East, and Central Africa, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (published by Eyre & Spottiswode). “At mid-day its waters (Lake Kivu) were dove-grey…” 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 39-40.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp7-10.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: A Bo’ddin o’ Cowls, by Arthur Stanley Umpleby. “A new volume of verses in the Cleveland Dialect.” 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 50-52.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: Dialect Poems and Prose by Thomas Blackah, with biography by Harald John Lexow Bruff. Blackah was a prolific dialect writer of Greenhow Hill, a lead miner, in the 19th century. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 52-53.

Halliday, W.J., “Some Corner of a Foreign Field” Poem in dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 55.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. “The demand for dialect plays still grows…Record of the Sheffield dialect now on sale…” Dialect piece from Mr John P. Maw of Westmoreland, New York (See under Maw, John P., below). 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 14-18.

Halliday, W.J.(and contributors), Yorkshire Dialect Drama. “The plays of … Dorothy Una Ratcliffe … Mr. F. Austin Hyde, Mr. J. R. Gregson, Mr. F.A. Carter, Miss Watson Dyke, Mr. R. A. H. Goodyear, Miss Florence Bone, Mr. George Jackson and many others, have been presented, on stage and by wireless, to large audiences… We have not a complete bibliography of Yorkshire dialect plays, but what follows partly repairs the omission…” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

H(alliday), W. J., Review of first issue of The Yorkshire Dalesman magazine. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 90.

Halliday, W.J., John Hartley. Photograph of Hartley as Dialect Reciter, page 26. Photograph of John Hartley and 2nd Wife “Mally” page 32. “In his prose writings …he is found at his best, and it is more difficult to write genuine and impressive…prose in dialect…John Hartley was a genuine singer of homely songs.” 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 27-34.

Halliday, Winifred [recte: ?Wilfred], Book Review, of: What Do they Know of Yorkshire by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (Eyre and Spottiswoode). “The author takes us to remote and lovely corners of the globe where Yorkshire folk … recreate … the corner of England that gave them birth… Dialect poetry is sometimes artificial, banal and harsh. D(orothy) U(na) R(atfliffe)’s is fresh and natural…” (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 22

Hampson, W. & Turner, Alderman Ben, Dialect Almanacks and Dialect Writers. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Hampson, W., On War. Poem in dialect. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 23-24.

HAND-KNITTING IN THE DALES. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

HARTLEY, JOHN, OF HALIFAX – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13. – Centenary: 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4, page 5, page 9; pp 26-34.

HAWES in WENSLEYDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

HEIDELBERG – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

HOLDERNESS DIALECT (“North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} . – compared with Dewsbury Dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 36-45.

HUDDERSFIELD DIALECT – Glossary of the Huddersfield Dialect (W.J.Haigh) – see Halliday, W.J., During the Year. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 7-8. – (“Western area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

HYDE, F. Austin, writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

HYDE, F. AUSTIN (Chairman of Y.D.S.) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

Hyde, F. Austen, Secretary’s Report. “The Society has a total membership of 248, including affiliated Societies.” 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 5-6.

Hyde, F. Austin, Secretary’s Report. “Particularly urgent is the need for collecting words, phrases, comparisons, traditional verse and song, which, preserved in speech for generations, are rapidly dying.” 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 5-6.

Hyde, F. Austin, Secretary’s Report. “Brief note of a Sheffield manufacturer sending his subscription and saying only ‘Here’s t’kelt, lad’…a craftsman in the United states, word-perfect in his native tongue though he left this country in 1886…” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 5-6.

Hyde-Parker, T., A Southerner on East Yorkshire Dialect. “Our hills are all howes, our valleys … dales, our ravines, ghylls , and our streams – where there are any – becks. (Compare Scarrow Beck and other becks in North Norfolk – Compiler) The use of the uninflected genitive … as in ‘Sha isn’t ma dowther: she’s wun o’ mi bruther gells.’” A farm accident: “Sholl’d off’n t’pike, an coom doon lampus-oh” (No translation given!). 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 37-40.

ICELANDIC LITERATURE – 8,000 books and pamphlets reported to be in Leeds University Library. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 9.

JACKSON, GEORGE, writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

Jones, J.D., Book Reviews of:
1. Old English Compound Place-Names in –ING, by Sigurd Karlström (Appelbergs, Uppsala 1927);
2. The Place-Names of North Devonshire, by Bertil Blomé (Appelbergs, Uppsala 1929);
3. A Contribution to the Study of the Conversion of Adjectives into Nouns in English, by Carl Bergener (Häkan Ohlsson, Lund 1928).
1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 45-47.

Jones, J.D., Review of: Leeds Studies in English and Kindred Languages. Nos. 1 & 2. 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 27-28.

Jones, J.D., Book Review of: A History of Modern Colloquial English, by H.C. Wyld (published by Basil Blackwell, Oxford). “There is not a dull page in the book, and it can …be said that it is a ktema es aei.” 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 40-42.

Jones, J.D., Review of: Leeds Studies in English and Kindred Languages (Numbers 3 & 4.) Refers inter alia to bibliography of work of Mrs E.M. Wright, Bruce Dickins and A.S.C. Ross. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 42-43.

Jones, J.D. Review of: Proceedings of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, Literary and Historical Section Vol. III Part VI. Refers to G. Turville-Petre , Bruce Dickins and R.M.Wilson. “Article by Mr A.S.C.Ross on The Middle English Poem on the Names of a Hare…[a] subject unusual and difficult” 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 43-44.

History of Modern Colloquial English, by H.C. Wyld (published by Basil Blackwell, Oxford). “There is not a dull page in the book, and it can …be said that it is a ktema es aei.” 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 40-42.

KEIGHLEY DIALECT (“Northern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

KETELL, of Farnham near Knaresborough, seer of demons. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

KIVU, LAKE – passim in Book Review 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 39-40.

LANCASHIRE DIALECT – IN WEST RIDING – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

LANDSMAALS ARKIV – see SWEDISH DIALECT RESEARCH.

LAKELAND DIALECT SOCIETY – 1st issue of Journal. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 6.

Laxdœla Saga. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

LEEDS DIALECT (“Northern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

LILT, IN DALES SPEECH. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 19.

List of Members:
(a) For 1897, reprinted. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 35-38.
(b) Current lists:
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 30-38.
1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 52-60.
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 51-59.
1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 35-43.
1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 45-53.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 59-68.
1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 64-74.
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 79-89.
1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 43-51.
(1940) {Part XLI Volume VI} pp 27-35.

LODGE OF KIRKBURTON – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Lodge, John, A Spring Holiday. Poem in West Riding dialect, part of dialect competition. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 31.

LOCKTON “TAR BARREL”. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 31-35.

LONGTHING, IKE – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

LORTON (CUMBERLAND) DIALECT. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

LOWER NIDDERDALE & PATELEY BRIDGE DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

McGRIGOR PHILLIPS, Mrs. (= Dorothy Una Ratcliffe) (President of the Y.D.S.) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

MacREGOL’S GOSPELS. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 11-25.

MALTON DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

MARKET WEIGHTON, POCKLINGTON & WOLDS DIALECT (“North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

MARSETT. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

MARSHLAND – see GOOLE.

MASSACHUSETTS COLONY. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 12.

Maw, John P. (Of Westmoreland, New York), “Noo lads…” Dialect prose piece. “ [Maw] left his native village of Thornton-le-Dale fifty-five years ago… ‘This is an example of the speech I remember hearing old farmers use…Noo gan an dea some mair greavin i’ t’ croft. Thoo gan t’ t’ stickhill and graith thi mother some eldin… My writing is poor because I am a blacksmith working every day with a hammer, and do not write much.’.” 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 16-17.

MERCIAN DIALECT (“Rushworth 1”). 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 14-15ff.

Metcalf, W. Day, Secretary’s Report. Joint meeting in Todmorden with Lancashire Societies. 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 5-6.

Metcalf, W. Day, Secretary’s Report for 1935. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 5-7.

MIDDLESMOOR & UPPER NIDDERDALE DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

MORRIS DANCING – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

MUMMERS – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

Nicholas, Q., A Mystery Solved. Poem in dialect. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 54.

Nicholas, Q. New Moon. Poem in dialect.
Bud, sickle-sheeäped an’ silver-breet
T’new moon’s on view ti-neet.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 55.

NIDDERDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

NIDDERDALE DIALECT – also see LOWER NIDDERDALE and UPPER NIDDERDALE.

NORSK ORDBOK – in Harold Bruff’s Secretary’s Report 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp5-13.

NORSKE SAMLAGET, DET – in Harold Bruff’s Secretary’s Report 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp5-13.

NORTH-EAST COAST (of N. Riding) DIALECT (“N. and E. parts of North Riding, of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

NORWEGIAN DIALECT RESEARCH AND LANDSMAAL DEVELOPMENT – in Harold Bruff’s Secretary’s Report 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 5-13.

NORTHUMBRIAN DIALECT (“Rushworth 2”). 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 14-15ff.

Offor, R. (Librarian, Leeds University), Two Mining Account Books from Farnley Colliery 1690-1720. Among cash entries, notes on Greek verbs and growing filberts, walnut and mulberry trees, there is much technical vocabulary: benck – a working place, coal face;
back end – the end of a coal face where a man could work on one side of the benck;
corves – large and strong baskets [for raising coal];
gall – galloway, any horse under the size of an ordinary draught horse;
thurle – to cut through from one working into another [e.g. bell pit]” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 9-28.

OLAUS MAGNUS – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

Old English Bynames (Gösta Tengvik) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Upsala University. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

OLMENAC, OLMINACK – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Opuscula Phonetica, Fasc. I to XI. &c. – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Det Kongelike Frederiks Universitet, Oslo. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

Ord og Sed (New Norse) (for the years 1934, 1936, and 1937) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Det Kongelike Frederiks Universitet, Oslo. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

Owl and the Nightingale (Middle English text). passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

OWUN, glossator and scribe. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 13-14.

PACE EGG – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

PATELEY BRIDGE & LOWER NIDDERDALE DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

PEARSE, SIR ALFRED. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 8.

Pearse, Alfred H., Aw’m Seein’ mi Lassie To-Neet. Poem in dialect.
“Eawr wark an’eawr whoams lie apart”
1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 32-33.

PHILLIPS, Mrs McGRIGOR – see Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una.

Phonology of the Suffolk Dialect, The (Helge Kökeritz) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Upsala University. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

PLOUGH STOTS. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII Volume V} pp 29-37.

POCKLINGTON, MARKET WEIGHTON & WOLDS DIALECT (“North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Pontefract, Ella, Dales Life and Character. Dialogue in dialect. Sketch of the Green at Town Head, Reeth in Swaledale, page 12. “ ‘Ah nivver count ma sheep. Ah ken ivvery yan i’ t’ flock ,’ from a Swaledale farmer.” (Names of locations indexed herein). (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

PRESTON, BEN – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Pre-Conquest Personal Names of Domesday Book (Olof von Feilitzen) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Upsala University. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

RADCLIFFE, Mrs. J. (Mayoress of Halifax) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

RADCLIFFE, Alderman J. (Mayor of Halifax) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

RATCLIFFE, DOROTHY UNA, writer of Yorkshire dialect drama – Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

RATCLIFFE, DOROTHY UNA, i.e. Mrs McGRIGOR PHILLIPS (President of the Y.D.S.) – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Granny Mat to her Grand-daughter Matilda. Poem in dialect. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 46.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Autumn Tryst. Poem in dialect.
…when rowans
Are a-reddening Fox Ghyll.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 16.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Gypsies at Barden Brig. Poem in dialect.
Then we would start a lillilow [small fire]
Wi’ cone an’ moss an’ twig.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 17.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Yorkshire Five (Aire, Wharfe, Nidd, Ure and Swale). Poem in dialect. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} page 49.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’ Laverock. Poem in dialect concerning the lark.
A laverock’s singin’
High oot of seet…
1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} page 50.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’ Cat Hole Inn. Poem in dialect.
Outside t’Cathole at Keld.
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 47.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Moorland Wife. Poem in dialect.
… how I hate
Din of these tram-cars,
Early an’ late
When wind is in alders
An’ becks are in spate.
1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} . pp 30-31.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Shepherd Agnostic. Poem in dialect. 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} page 43.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, When Jock o’ Dick Cooms a-Courtin’ Poem in dialect. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 47.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’ Football Match. Poem in dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 54.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Wall-Flowers. Poem in dialect.
It’s soothin’ just ti touch
Ya petals wi’ my fingers.
1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 54.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Lahl Hoose. Poem in dialect.
Theer t’becks is born a-laughin’
An’ ken just hoo to laik.
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 71-72.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Coom thi Ways In! (President’s Message). “If the Germans destroyed every historic building in this country, we should still retain the records of hundreds of years enshrined in some of the words of our language … Dialect is a simpler and earlier form of our language, one that is not subject to changes either of stress, intonation or fashion” (Is this true? – Compiler) (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 6-7

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Farmeress to her Son on Active Duty. Dialect Poem in the form of a letter.
We’ve been gi’en bran new cleugh-gates (gates of a mill-race) an’ our varra ancient mill
Has ben what’s called ‘reconditioned’ and is turnin’ wiv a will.
(1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 23-24

REETH IN SWALEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. Sketch on page 12 (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21

RICHMOND DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Roman de Rou (Norman French chronicle of Norman Dukes). passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

Ross, Alan S.C., Some Yorkshire Dialect Etymologies. “Yoadwath is an old joking name for Horsforth”. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 19-33.

ROTHERHAM DIALECT (“Southern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

ROWE, JOSEPH HAMBLEY, Chairman of Y.D.S. Council – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} page 2.

RUSHWORTH GOSPELS. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 11-25.

ST. GODRIC (of Finchale, Co. Durham). passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

ST. MATTHEW, GOSPEL OF (Quoting the gloss to chapter III. 1-7 from the Rushworth Gospels). 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 24-25.

St. Olaf, Passion and Miracles of – manuscript from Fountains Abbey. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

Saunterer’s Satchel, T’ – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Scargill, M.H., The Earliest Example of the West Riding Dialect. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 11-25.

SEDBERG(H) DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

SELBY DIALECT (“Eastern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

SHEEP, PREOCCUPATION WITH. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

SHEFFIELD DIALECT also CUTLERING DIALECT. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 9-36. – (“Southern area, South West Yorkshire group of North Midland type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

SHODDY, MUNGO – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

SKEAT, W.W., Prof. – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.
– CLASSIFICATION OF YORKSHIRE DIALECTS (too narrowly systematic? – Compiler). map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

SKIPTON DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

SOOTHILL, SAMMY – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

SOUTHERN NORTHUMBRIAN DIALECT (“Rushworth 2”). 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 14-15ff.

STAITHES DIALECT. 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 23-36.

Stead, Mrs Ethel, Owd Worshop: A Character Sketch. Prose piece in West Riding dialect, part of dialect competition. “ ’E wor nobbut a scrany sooart o’chap wi bow legs … ’Is maath wor nobbut a slit an’ it ewsed ta lift at one corner, that wor t’nearest ’e ivver gate to a smoile. Ther wor two things ’e loved dearly, one wor brass an’ t’other wor wark.” 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 31-36.

STOCKSBRIDGE DIALECT “nondescript”, passim in: Branston, R.V., The Dialect of Denby Dale. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 18-27.

Studies in Old English Manuscripts (Margareta Angström) – gifted to the Y.D.S. from Upsala University. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

SUFFOLK DIALECT. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} page 13.

SUTEALL, PETER – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

SVEALAND – see SWEDISH DIALECT RESEARCH.

SVERRIR, KING OF NORWAY. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

SWALEDALE DIALECT – also see UPPER SWALEDALE.

SWALEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

SWARDILS (sheep breed). (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 15.

SWEDISH DIALECT RESEARCH. “[The University of] Upsala has only managed to deal with a section running right across Sweden from West to East, representing mainly Svealand…about 700 records…there are innumerable dialects…spoken by quite small communities in the valleys and forests of Vermland and Dalarne.” – in Harold Bruff’s Secretary’s Report 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 5-13.

SWORD DANCE – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

SYKES, D.F.E. – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

SYMEON OF DURHAM. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

TEMPEST, SIR RICHARD, OF BRACEWELL. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 12.

THACKLEY – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

THIRSK DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

TREDDLEHOYLE, TOM – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Turner, Alderman Ben, M.P., & Hampson, W., Dialect Almanacks and Dialect Writers. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Turner, Ben, Wi’ Gentle, Modest Ways. Poem in dialect.
Let’s all bi plain an’ homely,
Untouched wi’ swank or side.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 28.

Turner, Ben, Ther’s Better Days to Come. Poem in dialect.
But still, owd lad,
Don’t look so sad,
Ther’s better days ’ull come.
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 48.

Turner, Ben, Th’ Henpecked Husband. Poem in dialect. “[The “Henpecked Club” meets in and about Hardcastle Crags on Easter Monday each year]”. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} page 49.

UMLAUT THE KITTEN – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

UMPLEBY, STANLEY – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 15; 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 12.

UMPLEBY, A. STANLEY, advert for his book of Cleveland verses, A Bo’ddin o’ Cowls. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 60.

Umpleby, Stanley, Ther’s an Au’d Willa’ Tree. Poem in dialect, part of dialect competition.
Thers a lahtle steean cot reeght awaay up i’ t’deeal…
1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 38-39.

Umpleby, Stanley, Au’d George, A Methody [Methodist] Pioneer. Prose piece in dialect, part of dialect competition. “Thoo mun he’ yah tune off bi Sunday, an’ it mun bi a common measure…he…to’n’d t’peeages o’ t’hymn-beeak ower ti ‘Arlington’”. 1933 {Part XXXIV Volume V} pp 39-40.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, The Dialect of Staithes. Includes diagram of a boat page 23. Folklore, Customs, Rhymes pp 34-36.
backstan ceeak – cake baked on a flat stone or metal plate over the fireplace
foy – a boat requiring assistance
kelk – codfish spawn
yallaboys – sovereigns (coins)
1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} pp 23-36.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, The Y.D.S. at the Yorkshire Show – A New Venture. What drew the crowds, including gramophone records of dialect being spoken. Photograph of those running the stand page 15. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 11-17.

Umpleby, Stanley, The Blind Girl. Poem in dialect.
Wiv ’er its nivver owt bud dark.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 48.

Umpleby, Stanley, A Proper Au’d ’Eeambo’d (A man who has never travelled and lives out his life in his own village). (“A sestina”) Poem in dialect.
Ah seear Ah deean’t knaw what fooak gans to ti see,
Off, ivvv’ry like, wi’ t’buses inti ti t’toons.
1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} pp 50-51.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, The Yorkshire Show Stand. A stand at the (agricultural) show run by Y.D.S. and the Cambridge University Yorkshire Society. “The work of the last two Yorkshire shows has done as much as anything to bring the work of the Society before Yorkshire people.” Photograph page 12. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 12-15.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, T’ Au’d Clogger. Prose piece in dialect, concerning a visit many years before to a maker of wooden shoes. “Ther’ war birk logs fresh oot o’ t’wood; logs pairtly shapped, clog sooals of all sizes, clog irons bi t’scoor.” 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 47-49.

Umpleby, Stanley, Gal Ellis Ghooast. Prose piece in dialect.
“Did t’u see it?” sha axed.
“Neea, bud Ah see’d it’ feeatins,” Ah ses.
“Thoo wants feeatins,” sha ses, “gahin’ oot for treeacle this taam o’ neet.”
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 56-58.

Umpleby, Stanley, A Ballad of the Great Coble Race, between Blyth Miners and Staithes Fishermen, 11th September 1866. Poem in dialect.
…t’talkin’ steered
Ti Steease t’au’d spot wheer ’e war reared,
An’ t’Whidby men ’ed laughed an’ cheered…
1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 74-76.

UPPER NIDDERDALE & MIDDLESMOOR DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

UPPER SWALEDALE & UPPER WENSLEYDALE DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

UPPER WENSLEYDALE & UPPER SWALEDALE DIALECT (“W. division of N.E. group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

USERS OF DIALECT “unaffected by modern school teaching” 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 8.

VERMLAND – see SWEDISH DIALECT RESEARCH.

WADDINGTON, Alderman J.H. – PHOTOGRAPH OF. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 4.

WAKETEA, URIAH – see ALMANACKS. 1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 9-13.

Waudswoman, A., Yorkshire Puddin. Prose piece in dialect. “Let puddin stand a bit, fra thotty minutes ti an oor…Baake whahl puddin rises ti top er tin, an is yaller-broon all ower.” 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 46.

WENSLEYDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

WENSLEYDALE DIALECT – also see UPPER WENSLEY-DALE

WENSLEYDALE DIALECT: recording project in abeyance because of World War II. 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} page 6.

WENSLEYDALE DIALECT PLAYS – see Yorkshire Dialect Drama. 1938 {Part XXXIX Volume VI} pp 34-46.

WEST COUNTRY MORRIS DANCING – see Dowson, F.W., Folk Lore of Plough Stots.

WEST RIDING DIALECT “Earliest example” (i.e. RUSHWORTH GOSPELS) 1939 {Part XXXX. Volume VI} pp 11-25.

WHARFEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

WHITBY DIALECT (“N. and E. parts of North Riding, of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Whittaker, Marcella, East or West, Which is Best? – The Dialects of Dewsbury and Holderness Compared. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 36-45.

WILLIAM OF NEWBURGH, CHRONICLER. 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

Wilson, R.M. Agricultural Terms in the East Riding: A Disappearing Technical Dialect. “‘Croskil’ (krɔskil) … simply cut the corn and was pushed not pulled, the horses being harnessed to a long pole behind the machine…The horse-rake has entirely displaced the old ‘swathe rake’ (swiəð rɛək) – a large wooden rake drawn by hand.” 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} pp 16-30.

WINDHILL DIALECT – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

WITTON, EAST. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

WOLD NEWTON, birthplace of William of Newburgh. passim in A Yorkshire Chronicler, 1934 {Part XXXV Volume V} pp 15-26.

WORSLEY, Sir W(ILLIAM) H. ARTHINGTON, Bt., President of Y.D.S. – PHOTOGRAPH 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} page 1. – death reported. Multis ille bonis flebilis occidit nulli flebilior quam nobis. 1935/6 {Part XXXVII. Volume V} page 4.

WRIGHT, ELIZABETH MARY – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

WRIGHT, JOSEPH – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

WYLD, H.C. – see Jones, J.D., Review of: A History of Modern Colloquial Englis, 1935/6 {Part XXXVII Volume V} pp 40-42.

YORK DIALECT (“Plain of York division of North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} .

Yorke, M.A., Grouse Drivers. Poem in dialect.
Gitten wet fall’n i’ t’ bog, esta?
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} pp 25-26.

Yorke, M.A., A Cradle Song. Poem in dialect.
Wi’ childer ther’s iver throng deed.
1931 {Part XXXII Volume V} page 27.

Yorke, M.A., A Bunch o’ Pansies. Poem in dialect. 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} page 48.

YORKSHIRE DIALECT SOCIETY – ORIGINS – see Halliday, W.J., Book Review of The Life of Joseph Wright, 1932 {Part XXXIII Volume V} pp 37-42.

YORKSHIRE DIALECT TYPES – MAP, inserted into front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} (For classification according to this chart, see under individual location name)

YORKSHIRE PUDDING – recipe in dialect. 1937 {Part XXXVIII Volume VI} page 46.

YORKSHIRE WOLDS DIALECT (“North Eastern Group of ‘Pure Northern’ type”) map, front of 1934/5 {Part XXXVI Volume V} . Also see EAST YORKSHIRE DIALECT.

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