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An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1961-1970

Diligence and vigilance on the part of the compiler have no doubt failed to remove all errors and misapprehensions from the following, for which I once again ask the indulgence of readers.

Ah’ve walked o’er Yorkshire’s hills, i’ t’dales
Through t’woods, by beck and sea.

Mary Thackeray Waller – An East Yorkshire Anthology, page 37.

ARKENGARTHDALE – see E(llis), S.

Atkinson, Frank, & Ward, Anne, A Pair of “Clog” Wheels from Northern England (of the early 19th century). Spokeless wheels fixed to the axle, the whole rotating within pegs, used 17th – 19th century in “highland parts of Northern England”, the whole vehicle known “tumble-carrs”. Quotations from literature concerning this Northern English equivalent of Mediterranean “groaning carts”. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 33-40.

Baines, Harry, T’Joiner’s Shop. Prose piece in dialect (Ripon): a craftsman talks to a younger apprentice about working in timber as it was and as it is. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 22-23.

Barry, Michael V., Yorkshire Sheep-Scoring Numerals. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 21- 31.

Beaumont, William, Question and Answer. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 30.

Beaumont, William, Molly an t’Brolly. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 30.

Beer, Doris, Tahm’s Change. Poem in West Riding dialect.
An’ tha would still luv ’Alifax
E’en though it’s changed its face.
1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 13.

BETHLEHEM – see Jarratt, A.

Brown, F., Bonny Lockwood. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Fain an’ glad
When t’leets
O’ Lockud blinked
Ther welcome rays.
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 24-26

.

Brown, F., “Froth and Bubble”. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 26-27.

Brown, F., T’Owd Gaffer an’ his Missus. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 12.

Brown, F., All Square. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 13.

Brown, F., Ten Seconds to Goa. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 13-14.

Brown, F., Me an’ Me-Sen. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 14.

Brown, Fred, Memories of Coltsfoot Rock. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Breet, brave, royal heralds,
Wat glad news d’yer bring?
Is yer blazin’ fanfare
Hailin’ t’cummin’ Spring?
1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 41.

Brown, Fred, Twinkling of an Eye. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page

41.

Brown, Fred, Smokeless Zone. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 42.

Brown, Fred, Wheer Beauty Dwells. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, Immigration. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 10.

Brown, Fred, Chipin’ Up. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 10.

Brown, Fred, Noa Angel. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 11.

Brown, Fred, Strew Red Rowan Berries. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 12.

Brown, Fred, “Weep! Sad World”. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 12.

Brown, Fred, Euclid’ Childer. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 12.

Brown, Fred, Breaking Point. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. Page 13.

Brown, Fred, Frost Pictures. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 14.

Brown, Fred, Dead-End Kids. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 15.

Brown, Fred, “Lady-bird, lady-bird, fly away home”. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 15.

Brown, Fred, Shoo that Spider! Shoo that Spider! Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 32.

Brown, Fred, “Wind o’ Change”. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 33.

Brown, Fred (? name of Riding and author missing), Where One door Shuts. Poem in dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 33.

Brown, Fred, What shall we do with a Drunken Starling? Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 34.

Brown, Fred, Ten Keys to Happiness. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 35.

Brown, Fred, Supermarket. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 36.

Brown, Fred, “Aunt Nancy”. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Well, bairns, it’s a reight poor do,
Ah’m flayed ah’ve nowt today.
1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. page 10.

Brown, Fred, Noa Huffin. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Twenty-four men on a draught-board: -
Well! happen it’s nobbut a game.
1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. page 11.

Brown, Fred, Groans i’ Stoan. Poem in West Riding dialect about insensitivity of town planning. 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. page 12.

Brown, Fred, Mrs Clancy Ponders. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, “Why do the Nations so Furiously Rage Together?” 4-line epigram in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, Remember Jericho? Poem in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, Old Mother Hubbard. Reworking in West Riding dialect of old nursery rhyme. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, Humpty Dumpty. Reworking in West Riding dialect of old nursery rhyme. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 9.

Brown, Fred, Jack and Jill. Facetious reworking in West Riding dialect of old nursery rhyme. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 10.

Brown, Fred, Segregation. Epigrammatic poem in West Riding dialect. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 10.

Brunk, W., The Farm Horse in Cleveland. “It seems … that in this area it was comparatively late that the horse became the main source of power [replacing] the ox. …The land was ploughed in ‘rig and fur’ … and [thereby] a farmer on the plain claims that on a 10-acre field one gained about 1 acre … wooden ploughs were used well into [the 20th] century.” 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 20-31.

BUDGERIGAR– see Dewhirst, I.

Carter, F.A., Tiv a Wensladill Hoss i’ Haytime. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Thoo finds thi own keep when we manage wi’oot thee,
Neea tax nor repairs, nor insurance nor nowt.
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 27.

Carter, F.A., To a Blackbird in Late Spring. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 28.

Carter, F.A., Foreign Travel. Poem in West Riding dialect.
An’ if they mun goo overseas, w’at’s wrang wi’ t’ Isle o’ Man? 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 29.

Carter, F.A., Thowts i’ Springtahme. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 42.

Carter, F.A., Yar Loin. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Happen it’s ’cos Ah live theer, mun,
But Ah shall allis say, for one,
Thra Cross Loin daän to Dogley Bar,
Wheer one is better, plenty’s war’
Nor yar loin.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 13-14.

Carter, F.A., Yorkshire Rubaiyat. Clever imitation in West Riding dialect of the metre and sentiment of Edward FitzGerald’s Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, substituting ale for wine:
Na watter’s made for weshin’, yo’ll agree.
Some reckon it’s for suppin’, but not for me!
Didn’t t’Lord turn watter into wahn?
Well, Ah’m for watter into ale, yo’ see.
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 16.

Carter, F.A., Crookback Dick. Poem in West Riding dialect, concerning the 15th century English king, Richard III. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. pp 11- 12.

CARTWORTH MOOR – see North, G.

CLEVELAND POETRY – see Cowley, W.

CLOG WHEELS – see Atkinson, F.

COLTSFOOT ROCK – see Brown, F.

CONTENTS OF VOLUMES: 1. A brief listing for Volume I, Part I, through to Volume X, Part LX. 1961. pp 67-74.
2. A brief listing for Volume I, Part I, through to Volume XI, Part LXI. 1962. pp 65-73.
3. From Volume I, Part I through to Volume XI, Part LXII. 1963. pp 72-80.
4. From Volume I, Part I, through to Volume XI, Part LXIII. 1964. pp 75-83.
5. From Volume I, Part I through to Volume XI, Part LXIV. 1965. pp 61-69.
6. From Volume I, Part I through to Volume XI, Part LXV. 1966. pp 72-80.
7. From Volume I, Part I through to Volume XII, Part LXVI. 1967. pp 73-82.
8. From Volume I, Part I through to Volume XII, Part LXVII. 1968. pp 67-76.
9. Volume XII only, Parts LXVI-LXVIII. 1969. page 53.
10. Volume XII only, Parts LXVI-LXIX. 1970 . page 61.

Cowley, W., The Dialect Poetry of Cleveland. Includes Lyke Wake Dirge, “Willie’ Wagon” (“genuine folk-speech”), John Castillo, and the “giant” of fame, Richard Blakeborough, Stanley Umpleby, F.W.Dowson (Goathland) and Frank Elgee. Points out abiding rural nature of North as opposed to e.g. West Riding. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 8-17.

DANO-NORWEGIAN – see Wade, G.

DENTDALE DIALECT – see Wakelin, M.F.

DEVON DIALECT – see Harris, M.

Dewhirst, Ian, Warkin’ in t’Autumn. Poem in West Riding dialect.
…leaves come dahn
An’ caught in t’hedge like bits o’ yeller rags…
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 31.

Dewhirst, Ian, February Fill-Dyke. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Whativver ah sud try to do
Wi’ foot off t’flags a step or two,
Ah’m mud to t’eyes an’ clammy through,
February Fill-Dyke.
1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 15-16.

Dewhirst, Ian, The Haworth Water-Wolf, and Others. Prose account of folklore phenomena with dialogue in dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 25-27.

Dewhirst, Ian, Bill o’th’Hoylus End and “Th’History o’ Haworth Railway.” Discussion of and extracts from a 16-page pamphlet representing the dialect and humour of the Keighley – Haworth area, with its Brontë connections, in the 1860s. “A crookt legg’d pedlar com fra Keighley wun day wi winter-edges, and they tuke him for a sapper and miner et hed cum to mezhur for the railway, and mind yoh they did mak summat on him, they thout that the winter-edges wur the apparatus to mezhur by.” 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 32-36.

Dewhirst, Ian, Kinnin’s (Chilblains). Poem in West Riding dialect.
We’ve hed a frost sin’ Sunda last,
An’ a snaw dustin’-ower;
T’wick-owd dubs are frozen fast,
An’ t’yard-end pump weant goa.
1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 43.

Dewhirst, Ian, To Snawdrops Comin’ Too Soon. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 14-15.

Dewhirst, Ian, Some West Riding Funeral Customs. “Exigences … prompted the custom whereby mourners contributed towards the funeral expenses.” 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 25-27.

Dewhirst, Ian, Pot o’ Two. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 29.

Dewhirst, Ian, Hoam Tahn (Home Town). Poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 17.

Dewhirst, Ian, Realism and Sentimentality in Nineteenth-Century West Riding Dialect Verse. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 15-20.

Dewhirst, Ian, To a Moth. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 37.

Dewhirst, Ian, Hitler is a Bad Un! Prose piece in West Riding dialect. Difficulties experienced in trying to make a pet budgerigar curse the German leader. 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 18-19.

Dewhirst, Ian, The Field Names of Near and Far Oxenhope in 1838. Lists types of names for “every scrap of land” dealt with in a valuation of the Haworth area in 1838. 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 40-42.

Dewhirst, Ian, If Aw could Tell Thee. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 10.

Dewhirst, Ian, “Pie” Leach. A larger-than-life character in 19th century Keighley, contemporary of Bill o’ th’Holyus End. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. pp 21- 24.

Drake, Harry, Owd Lass. Poem in West Riding dialect about a “little terrier bitch”. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 44.

Dyson, Ben T., Notes on West Riding Dialect Verse. The author applies then-contemporary critical standards to dialect writing, complaining at tendencies to banality, didacticism and sentimentality. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. pp 17-27.

editors, Editorial: “can only hope that the excellent balance of former years of accurate scholarship coupled with wide appeal, has been maintained with this issue.” 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 5-6.

editors (?), Book Review, of: The Cranesbill Caravan, An Idyll in Upper Wensleydale, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 43-44.

editors (?), Book Review, of: North Country Tales: Brass, a West Riding Story, by William Beaumont. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 44-45.

editors (?), Book Review, of: The Viking Century in East Yorkshire, by A.L.Binns, University of Hull, East Yorkshire Local History Series monograph, No. 15, 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. “The Danes seemed to have preferred the East and North Ridings, whilst the Norwegians … settled more in the area of the Dales … In recent years the experts have tended to minimise the numbers of these settlers … but … Mr. Binns … still favours the older view. He … rightly stresses the value of the linguistic evidence.” 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 51-52.

editors (?), Book Review, of: English Dialects, by G.L.Brook. “Dialect study is capable of exactness and precision and cannot be satisfied with a vaguely sentimental approach.” 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 52.

editors (?), Book Review, of: Mair Laeves fae Vagaland, by T.A.Robertson. Poems in Shetlandic – “To anyone who has not known ‘Shetlanrie’ spoken, there is no assistance in how to pronounce … it.” 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 36.

editors (?), Book Review, of: The Handloom Weaver and Other Poems, by Ian Dewhirst. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 36-37.

editors (?), Book Review, of: An East Riding Anthology, edited by Bill Cowley. “With fewer inhabitants, the East Riding has produced fewer dialect poets.” 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 37-38.

Ellin, Clare, Cuddy’s Song. Poem in dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 29.

Ellin, Clare, Coortin. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 16.

Ellin, Clare, Cum, See a Miracle! Poem in East Riding dialect.
An est ha seed a flat o rye
Asleep agean a mornin’ sky
Early on i’ June, -
Wetched it waken at day’s dawnin
Blue anent a settin moon?
1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 45.

Ellin, Clare, Swaddin’ Peas. Poem in East Riding dialect.
Seea I pept through t’ole in t’vic’rage wall
Ti ger a peek at t’oose.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 15.

Ellin, Clare, Ti t’Choch o’ Sunda. Poem in East Riding dialect.
18 words glossed.
Us bairns went leeakin’ in t’banks an’ t’bushes
For jinny wren nests, an’ tits an’ thrushes.
1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 30-31.

Ellin, Clare, A Man Bairn. Poem in East Riding (Holderness) dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 18.

Ellin, Clare, Wha wer Johnny Moblin? Poem in East Riding dialect. “John Moblin was any experienced workman in charge of a gang of beginners or inexperienced men” – footnote. 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. page 13.

Ellis, Stanley, Dialectal English and the Scholar. A report on “one more, and possibly the last, co-ordinated, large-scale investigation” of the linguistic geography of dialect, namely the Survey of English Dialects. A sample question, “What do you call the place where you keep the animals that give you milk?” produced for the 34 Yorkshire locations cow-byre, cow-hole, cow-house, cow-hull, cow-shed, mistall, and shippon. This shows the presuppositions and tendency of the questioning: photograph of Professor Orton, Stanley Ellis and Dr W. J. Halliday at work, page 30, sample questionnaire result, page 33, “Cow-House” variant spot map for Northern England and Isle of Man, page 35. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 28-38.

E(llis?), S(tanley?), Review of 45rpm disc, Yorkshire Folk Singers, recorded by N.A. & M. Hudleston. “Here we have the authentic flavour of countrymen in their own homes”. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 45.

E(llis?), S(tanley?), Book review, of: Phonematische Analyse des Dialekts von Gateshead-upon-Tyne, County Durham. (Cram, de Gruyter & Co., Hamburg, 1966). “The great and lasting value of the work to a student of dialect is the first-class bibliography it contains…Great deal of the book … working over … other people’s writings and opinions…The problems of the investigation of town dialects … are so complex as to be insoluble, in the opinion of this reviewer … Dr Viereck’s attempt is a brave one.” 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 49-50.

(Ellis, Stanley?) Book review, of: Phonological Atlas of the Northern Region, by Eduard Kolb, Bern. “Maps are … spectacular in the presentation of this kind of material and most people will more readily receive from maps the immediate impact of the border between the North Midland type of dialect spoken in the West Riding, and the Northern speech of the East and North Ridings.” 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 43-44.

Ellis, Stanley, Prayer Answered. Prose piece in dialect. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 16.

E(llis?), S(tanley?), Book review of: A Bonny Hubbleshoo: Recollections and Stories from Swaledale and Arkengarthdale, by Margaret Batty. “Stories … largely in dialect.” 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 34.

E(llis?), S(tanley?), Book review of Scandinavian Personal Names in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire by Gillian Fellows-Jensen. (Akademisk Forlag, Copenhagen, 1968). Names from the great partitioning of 876 to the ousting by Norman names after 1250. Over 350 pages. Orthography of names in records shows sound-changes: useful to show Scandinavian origins of names, including some placename elements. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 35.

FARM HORSES – see Brunk, W. Also see PONIES

FILEY FISHING TERMS – see Widdowson, J.

FISHING TERMS – see Widdowson, J. – see Wright, P.

FOLK LIFE – see Sanderson, S.

FOLK MUSEUM – see Phillips, V.

FOLK SINGERS – see E(llis), S.

Forster, Gordon C.F., Parliamentary Election Scandals in Stuart Yorkshire: Knaresborough 1640 – 1642 and Scarborough 1645. “The electorate at Scarborough … consisted of the 2 bailiffs, 2 coroners, 4 chamberlains, and 36 burgesses … 44 electors in all.” 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 20-32.

FUNERAL CUSTOMS – see Dewhirst, I.

Halliday, Donald, Sunset. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 46.

Halliday, W.J., The Retirement of Mrs McGrigor Phillips. Tribute to Dorothy Una Ratcliffe on retiring as President of the Y.D.S. “She has been our leading dialect poet for many years.” 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 9-10.

H(alliday?), W.J., Book Review, of: Of Mills, Moors and Men, by John Waddington-Feather (Ridings Publishing Co., Driffield). 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 48.

H(alliday?), W.J., Book Review, of: Back and Other Poems (Dialect and Otherwise), by F.A.Carter (Ridings Publishing Co., Driffield). “One of our leading dialect poets…the dialect poems are … first-rate dialect.” 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 48-49.

H(alliday?), W.J., Book Review, of: The Golden Galloway and Other Verses, by Gwen Wade (Ridings Publishing Co., Driffield). “The dialect is never conventional or ordinary, and the versification is always harmonious and musical.” 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 49-50.

Harris, Dr Martin, Juncture and Pause in a South-Western Dialect. “Juncture” is the pause between words, often lost in English speech, even more so in that of South Zeal, Devon, the subject of this article. “However, there is another factor tending to work in the opposite direction. There is always a juncture feature [=short pause] … between the end of one intonation tune and the start of the next …[as in] ‘from this place here’ /fr məðıs ,plejs ,ji:r/ …” Interesting reference to speech intonation, a factor often overlooked or under-emphasised in dialect study. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. pp 25-29.

HAWORTH &c. FOLKLORE – see Dewhirst, I.

HEDEVIND, BERTIL – see Wakelin, M.F.

Hedger, Ruth, Doctors. Prose piece in North Riding dialect. “Bud awivver, when Ah wer a lad at Throstlewood ther warn’t all this tahme waasted sittin’ waaitin’ aboot i’ t’doctthor’ surgery.” 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 39-42.

Hedger, Ruth, The Farm Lass Soliloquises. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 46.

Hedger, Ruth, Ballade of Church Finance. Poem in North Riding dialect on the eternal round of jumble sales, etc., for funding a church, in the style of a medieval French ballade. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 16.

Hepworth, Mary E., Ta’en Ooar. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Terneet Ah stopped back for a minnit
An’ lewked at t’long shed wi’ all t’looms,
Ah’ve fettled an’ oiled ’em an’ luved ’em
Thru’ war an’ depression an’ booms.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 17.

Hepworth, Mary E., To a Snowdrop. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Aye, but thar’t a grand little flahr
Wi’ thi white head held bravely
O’ thi frail green stem.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 18.

Hill, Lewis, Points Ahead! Poem in West Riding dialect – worries about the 1971 introduction of decimal coinage. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 10.

HOLDERNESS DIALECT – Ellin, C. – see R.W.

Holdsworth, Alfred, Drover’s Homecoming. A poem in West Riding dialect.
Hush, mi bonnie laddie –
Hearken for thi daddie,
Whisht, – it is thi daddie
Comin’ hooam again –
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 19.

HOLMFIRTH – see Moore, S.

HUDDERSFIELD DIALECT – see Sykes, D.

INTEGRATION, IN (U.S.) SCHOOLS – see MacDavid, R.

INTONATION – see Harris, M.

Jackson, (Mrs) F.E., Gumption. A poem in East Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 32.

Jackson, (Mrs) F.E., Thee an’ Me. A poem in East Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 33.

Jackson, (Mrs) F.E., Mi Rowan Tree. A dialect poem from Selby. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 17.

Jackson, F.E., Nowt so Queer. Poem in dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 47.

Jackson, F.E., “Edie an’ Me”. A poem in West Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 20.

Jackson, F.E., Wha wod a Thowt it. Prose piece in dialect. “The’ wer fooak ’at used ti gan bi t’train teea an’ frae the’wark ivvery day…” 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 41-44.

Jarratt, Arthur, The Innkeeper. Poem in East Riding dialect. The Nativity of the Lord Jesus at Bethlehem re-told with the innkeeper as the narrator.
Noo, God’s bairns is all on ’em lovely,
- Why, oor awn was a bonny, wee thing.
An’ Ah play wiv ’em, noss ’em, an’ love ’em –
Yit we knelt like we would tiv a king!
1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 14-15.

Jackson, F.E., “Nobbut Dowley”. Poem in West Riding dialect.
It’s nobbut dowley all be yirsen
Nobbut dowley.
1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 12.

JET MINING – see Todd, H.

JUNCTURE – see Harris, M.

KILDEN (GABRIEL SCOTT) – see Wade, G.

KNARESBOROUGH – see Forster, G.

Kolb, Dr Eduard, An Exercise in Dialect Detection. Using the Basic Material of the “Survey of English Dialects” Dr Kolb manages to locate dialect speech recorded in literature to some spot between Heptonstall and Wibsey, before revealing that it is a question of the Haworth speech of old Joseph in Wuthering Heights. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 11 – 17.

LOWMAN, GUY S. – see Viereck, W.

McKelvie, D., Book Review, of: The Foals of Epona: A History of British Ponies from the Bronze Age to Yesterday, by A. Dent & D. Machin Goodall (Galley Press, London). The reviewer declares this equine history to be eminently readable. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 42-43.

McDavid, Raven I., Dialectology and the Integration of the Schools. Addressing the 2nd International Congress of Dialectologists, the author argues in favour of a linguistic element, supplied by the insights of dialectologists, in the accommodation of school teaching methods to disadvantaged groups – notably African-Americans of the U.S.A. “Mr Ellis of Leeds” in the discussion tried to apply this to in-migration into English cities, while “Mr Schmitt, of Marburg” commented on the variety of situations in which dialect and language difference reflected social patterns: each situation to be judged by its own merits, without reference to any other. Studies of the speeches of such places as Chicago, Akron and Tyneside are “more intensive applications of the traditional methods of dialectology, adapted to an urban situation.” 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 18-27.

Martin, Sydney, Snow on the Wolds. Poem in East Riding dialect.
It’s been snawin’ agean
Up ’ere o’ t’waurd,
We’re used tiv it though,
Wi’ t’wind an t’caurd.
1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. pp 12-13.

MERITON’S YORKSHIRE DIALOGUE – see Thomson, R.

MIDSHIPTHOFT – see Wright, P.

Moore, Scholes, Cynic. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 33-34.

Moore, Scholes, “Homfoth”. Poem in West Riding dialect in praise of the town of Holmfirth. It pulls its sons an’ dowters back, Lahke lampleet pulls a moth. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 18.

Moore, Scholes, Bob Hardisty. Poem in West Riding dialect about memories evoked by a “checker’d brat” (work apron). 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 48.

Moore, Scholes, The Widower. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 18.

Moore, Scholes, The Lonely Wife. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 19.

Myers, Irene, Three Dowters. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 19.

Norris, J.H., My Wife. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 34-35.

North, Gordon Allen, Mi Lovely, Lovely Lassie … Lyrical poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 35.

North, Gordon Allen, Comment. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 19.

North, Gordon Allen, Memorial. Poem in West Riding dialect about a war memorial. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 49.

North, Gordon Allen, Night Worker. Poem in West Riding dialect.
At knockin’-off tahme, thick i’ t’ yed,
He stum’les aat, i’ t’ cowd,
An’ thinks o’ nowt but whom an’ bed
Whal crossin’ t’ factory fowd.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 20.

North, Gordon Allen, Boy in Budapest 1964. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 21.

North, George Allen, Arrunden. Poem in West Riding dialect.
A little spot lahke Arrunden,
At t’ fooit o’ Cartworth Moor.
1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. pp 31- 32.

North, George Allen, Midnight Interlude. Prose dialogue in dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 9-11.

North, George Allen, Odense 1965. Poem in West Riding dialect.
An’ then Ah saw misen,
A rooasy, barekneed lad o’ yusteryer,
Leeanin’ ageean a crum’lin’ Pennines wall…
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 21.

North, George Allen, Mongrel. Poem in dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 38.

North, George Allen, Night Men Talking. Prose piece in dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 42-44.

North, George Allen, Don’t Cry for Me. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 11.

North, Gordon Allen, School Leaver. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 13.

North, Gordon Allen, Winter Nights. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. pp 13-14.

NORWEGIAN – see Wade, G. (twice)

Orton, Professor Harold, Report on the S(urvey of) E(nglish) D(ialects): Northern Volume. “Readers may be reminded that the field investigations concerned in this … survey were carried on between 1950 and 1961, and that … 311 rural localities … were visited by … 9 fieldworkers, who secured their information by asking a small number of carefully selected, elderly dialect-speaking informants over 1300 questions.” “SELF is a Northern shibboleth ” – variant forms as myself, myseln, mysen, mysell; colloquial expressions for one’s husband or wife. Sample page of phonetic transcription of “to be” forms, page 10. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 8-13.

PAUSE – see Harris, M.

Phillips, Vincent H., Oral Traditions and the Folk Museum. How the Welsh Folk Museum at St. Fagans Castle, near Cardiff, seeks to express the material and non-material culture of the Welsh people through otherwise non-related objects, assisted by interviews with older people who may have used such objects – “an overwhelming task of collection”. Folk traditions are seen to be “assimilated from earlier generations through communication on the hearth”, but “the actual content of oral tradition can never be defined exactly alike for all countries”. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 13-19.

“PIE” LEECH – see Dewhirst, I.

PLACE-NAMES – see Smith, A. – see Thomson, R.

PONIES – see McElvie, D. Also see FARM HORSES.

R.W., The Farmer’s Lament. Poem in East Riding (Holderness) dialect, “communicated by Mrs Ellin”.
Ah’d set yat stoups, an’ sharp me lae
Wi’ strickle when Ah mew me ’ay.
1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 16-17.

RATCLIFFE, DOROTHY UNA – see Halliday, W.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Lambin’ Storm. Poem in North Riding dialect.
“Cheddy-yow! Cheddy-yow!”
That wur mi gaffer’s cry
To ewes oot on t’brant hill
When lambin’ snaws wur nigh.
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 22.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, End o’January. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 23.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Deeleas II. Poem in North Riding dialect about a pet dog.
Fra’ early morn while mirk o’neet,
Thoo’d fiercely waff at whistlin’ lads.
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 23-24.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Lost Pup. Poem in North Riding dialect.
Think ’at it’s followed anuther bairn
’At gies it a vast o’ care
Or gane wi’ t’raggle-taggle gypsies
Or is laikin’ wi’ folks at a fair.
1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 9.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Ballad o’ Tinker Tim. Poem in North Riding dialect.
He doffed his boots, then his weathered hat
An’ heard a throstle sing.
“It’s a different sang, Hey! Laddie my Bird!
To t’yan thoo whustled last Spring.”
1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 9-11.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Calf. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 11.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Whisperin’ Corner (for t’Owner). Poem in North Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 40.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, October Moors. Poem in North Riding dialect.
They’re leading breckons doon fra moors
For cattle-beddin’
1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 40.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Song o’ Trottingshaw. Poem in dialect.
T’ling weänt last foriver,
An’ breckons will turn gowd.
1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 22.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, March Weather. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 23.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, On a Northern Moor. Poem in dialect.
Gazin’ awhile on far glishy hills,
Harkin’ to lilts o’ laverock an’ chatty.
1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 32.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Maltese Pup an’ Nameless Cat. Poem in dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 22.

RICHARD III – see Carter, F.

RUBÁIYÁT- see Carter, F.

Sanderson, Stewart F., The University of Leeds Folk Life Survey. Material collected included children’s games and songs from Leicester, Manchester, Leeds and Guiseley, Easter customs from Lancashire, the craft of needle, etc. making in Redditch, “250 items” of “general folklore” from Wetwang, and no less than 75 “folksongs” from the North Riding. Framework established from the index of University of Uppsala and Nordisk Museum folk collections. Sample questionnaire on Easter eggs on page 41. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 38-41.

SCANDINAVIAN – see E(llis), S. Also see VIKINGS.

SCARBOROUGH – see Forster, G.

SELF AS NORTHERN SHIBBOLETH – Orton, H.

SHAW, GEORGE BERNARD – see Waddington-Feather, J.

Shaw, George Bernard, facsimile of letters sent to Ben Turner, 1923, asking for stories in dialect to give “Northern” colour to his character of St. Joan. Loose leaf in Transactions 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}.

SHEEP SCORING (COUNTING) – see Barry, M.

SHETLANDIC – see “editors”

Smith, A.H., Some Place-Names of the West Riding. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 5-14.

SOUTH ZEAL – see Harris, M.

Stark, Kathleen, Laburnum. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 31.

Stark, Kathleen, T’Rocking-Chair. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 32.

Stark, Kathleen, King’s Square, York. Poem in East Riding dialect.
There’s gabled hooses, awd an’ high,
Wi t’Minster showin’ ower t’roofs,
Sa grand an’ grey, agean t’blue sky.
1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 20.

Stark, Kathleen, T’Hoss Blinnders. Poem in East Riding dialect about blinkers once used by working horses on a farm. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 20.

Stark, Kathleen, Purple and Gowld. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 49.

Stark, Kathleen, T’ Sunrise. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 23.

Stark, Kathleen, Lullaby. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 33.

Stark, Kathleen, T’Weather. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 33.

Stark, Kathleen, Tribute tiv a Wallfloower. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 23.

Stark, Kathleen, End o’ t’Day. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 23.

Stark, Kathleen, T’ Summer Bairn. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 39.

Stark, Kathleen, Fine Awd Hoss. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 11.

STEEL TERMS – see Wright, P.

SWALEDALE – see E(llis), S.

Sykes, Donald R., The Vowel Sounds of the Huddersfield Dialect. [ontruəd] = on the road; [intθεəs] = in the house. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. pp 18-21.

Thomson, R.L., Book Review, of: The Dialect of George Meriton’s “A Yorkshire Dialogue” (1683) by Christopher Dean (Y.D.S. reprint 1962). Although Meriton’s work is “ill-constructed doggerel” Professor Dean makes use of it to examine the pronunciation of particular vowels and other linguistic features. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 43-45.

Thomson, R.L., Celtic Place-Names in Yorkshire. Intriguing but often unconvincing shots at Brythonic etymologies. “There is … little sign that the Brythonic language continued in use long enough to be regarded as Old Welsh in this region.” – yet Thomson mentions Catraeth (Catterick) in the 6th-century Welsh poems of Aneurin, set locally in this area, as well as the Efrawg (York) of the chroniclers. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 41-55.

THORNTON-LE-DALE – see Wade, G.

Todd, Harry, Jet-Mining at the Head of Bilsdale: Some memories of Harry Todd, born at North Woods Farm, Bilsdale, 1883; farmed Holme Farm for 50 years. Prose piece in dialect. “He was fleead t’yowes wad be snawn ower ’eead, seea he teak t’hoss an rad over bi t’tthrack inti t’incut (intak).” 1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. pp 37-39.

TOWN PLANNING – see Brown, F.

TURNER, BEN – see Waddington-Feather, J.

UPPSALA – Studia Anglistica Upsaliensis – see Wakelin, M.F.

Viereck, Dr. Wolfgang (University of Hamburg), Book Review, of: Survey of English Dialects (B): The Basic Material: Vol. IV: The Southern Counties, edited by Harold Orton & Martyn F.Wakelin. “The attention of … dialectologists seems to have been more attracted by the North than the South of the British Isles. This is especially true of German Anglists.” 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 45-46.

Viereck, Dr W., Guy S. Lowman’s Contribution to British English Dialectology. Lowman was a native of Columbia, Missouri, who studied under phoneticist Daniel Jones in London, and, after investigating for publications on U.S. dialects made his contribution to the English southern counties dialectology. Distribution maps for dialect variants on “earthworm”, etc. page 35. Imperfections in method lead to unclear vision of the origins of dialect vocabulary in America. 1968 {Part LXVIII. Vol. XII}. pp 32-39.

Viereck, Dr Wolfgang, The English Dialect Society and its Dictionary. Predecessors to Joseph Wright’s monumental task. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. pp 28-33.

VIKINGS – see “editors”. Also see SCANDINAVIAN.

Waddington-Feather, John, Sir Ben Turner (1863 – 1942). Turner, from a poor working-class background, grew up in a dialect environment and was an early member of the Y.D.S. as well as radical socialist politician. On a 1920 visit to Russia, he “told Lenin bluntly that he disapproved of Soviet revolutionary methods.” Includes an account of letters by George Bernard Shaw sent to Ben Turner, 1923, asking for stories in dialect to give “Northern” colour to his character of St. Joan. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. pp 14-20.

Wade, Gwen, Prescription. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 36.

Wade, Gwen, Writin’ a Poim. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 36.

Wade, Gwen, Laikin’ Tally on Pott Moor. Poem in West Riding dialect.
There’s nowt but ling an’ t’moorcock’s din
An’ t’rullet’s ring o’ bells.
1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 37.

Wade, Gwen, Farm Economy in Airedale. Prose piece in West Riding Dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 42.

Wade, Gwen, Backend, Crook Gill. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 21.

Wade, Gwen, Old Man’s Harvest. Poem in West Riding dialect. Unusual and difficult references, such as Backend, Newtons, aboon mi’ collar, ton ’em all to blather. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. page 21.

Wade, Gwen, Weshin-Days. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Theeas weshin-days is noan si bad
For all Ah groan an grahse…
Ah when Ah gits to hangin, why
Ah pins mi thowts agen t’blew sky.
1963 {Part LXIII. Vol. XI}. page 50.

Wade, Gwen, Spring Ahtin. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. page 24.

Wade, Gwen, The Art Market. A prose piece in West Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 28.

Wade, Gwen, To a Rhodie Hen, Seen with a Cletch of Peacock Poults at Thornton-le-Dale. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Tha wahmed em patiently thruff t’wicks,
Wi dreams o’ t’fluffy, caller chicks
At mowt ha bin.
1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 34.

Wade, Gwen, T’Moor. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 35.

Wade, Gwen, Bereavement. 4-line epigrammatic poem in West Riding dialect. 1965 {Part LXV. Vol. XI}. page 35.

Wade, Gwen, Puzzilment. Poem in West Riding dialect.
Ah awns Ah dahns mi dinner,
- We’re bahn to eit, o’ course –
An t’laiky lamb at onny gate
Knaw’d nowt abaht t’mint-sauce.
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 24.

Wade, Gwen, Unharrowed Ground. Poem in West Riding dialect.
For it’s wick wi field-pansy,
Wi pig-nut an tansy,
Burnet an buttercup,
Bonny es owt!
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. page 25.

Wade, Gwen, T’Three Awd Crones o’ Lee. Poem in West Riding dialect in the manner of a narrative ballad.
Next Backend blew a flaysome storm,
Wi leetnin Zig-tu-three;
An all neet lang did t’yesty beck
Rush bealin dahn to t’sea.
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 26-27.

Wade, Gwen, A Norwegian Nursery Rhyme. Rendering into West Riding dialect of the rhyme Edderkoppen, Satt in toppen. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 39.

Wade, Gwen, Yorkshire – “Britain’s Texas”. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. page 40.

Wade, Gwen, A Call to Y.D.S. Youth. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1969 {Part LXIX. Vol. XII}. page 12.

Wade, Gwen, May Day 1970. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 14.

Wade, Gwen, Norwegian Fisherman’s Rhyme. Accomplished rendering in West Riding dialect verse of six-stanza poem in (Dano-)Norwegian from Gabriel Scott’s Kilden.
Torsken er graa og hvillingen hvid
Og enes godt i en gryde …
T’whitin is white an t’cod’s grey
An boath on em grand i a pan.
1970 {Part LXX. Vol. XII}. page 15.

Wakelin, Martyn F., Book Review, of: The Dialect of Dentdale in the West Riding of Yorkshire (Studia Anglistica Upsaliensis), by Bertil Hedevind. “We gather that during the time [Dr Hedevind] spent in Dentdale … he came to know his informants extremely well … helping them with the haymaking…The development of M[iddle] E[nglish] ō (Dent /iu/) will be of interest …” 1967 {Part LXVII. Vol. XII}. pp 47-49.

Waller, Mary Thackeray, Hill Top. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 38.

Waller, Mary Thackeray, Youngest Idea. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1961 {Part LXI. Vol. XI}. page 38.

Walton, R.D., Cuop Thrip til Lundun. Prose piece in dialect (Bridlington) about a train trip to London organised by a local co-operative society. 1962 {Part LXII. Vol. XI}. pp 23-25.

Ward, Anne – see Atkinson, Frank.

Widdowson, J.D.A., The Dialect of Filey: A Selection of Terms Concerning Fishing and the Sea.
“BUTT: The halibut …
CAVE: to separate old bait, seaweed and other unwanted material from a used fishing line…
WOLF, WUFF: Catfish.”
1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 28-41.

Wright, Dr. P., Proposal for a Short Questionnaire for Use in Fishing Communities. “A number of phonetic and grammatical curiosities …(e.g.) Staithes folk ‘fork’, kolk ‘cork’ … and Filey kelk ‘church’ … Marshside (Lancs.) Bobm ‘Bob’, ladn ‘lad’, pign ‘pig’… frequent phonetic absorption [and disappearance] of the and a … Informants should be elderly natives, should have lived in the locality up to age 20 … and most or all of the time since then.” Among the “notions to be named” are “the seats in a coble, from stem to stern: Carling Thoft, Forethoft, Midshipthoft, Loose Thoft, After Thoft.” 1964 {Part LXIV. Vol. XI}. pp 27-32.

Wright, Dr. P., Yorkshire Steel Terms Today. Elevation diagram of blast furnace with parts numbered, page 42. “SWAGE TOOLS (for bending and shaping the ingot); a DYE (a 4-ft. metal container for up-ending it and impressing a design upon it)…” 1966 {Part LXVI. Vol. XII}. pp 41-47.

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