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An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1911-1920

With some pathos we find, in the middle of World War I, a recruiting song turned into Yorkshire dialect: the sombre words “Somme” and “the trenches” also appear on the page in this decade. We feel that the Transactions have not quite found their path: teetering sometimes between a literary journal and a folkloristic one: with large articles that should perhaps have stood as booklets by themselves, and still searching for the “pure, natural” Anglo-Saxon English which is supposed to be preserved in regional dialect. For the indexer, there is the challenge of enabling those of this century to find what they need in the context of a hundred years gone by. We need too to name-drop, so that the contribution of those who participated in the work of the Society can be traced to source. There were two issues of Transactions dated 1914: one in January {Part XV} and another in December {Part XVI} – as if to compensate, there was no issue dated 1918 – we move straight on from 1917 {Part XIX} to 1919 {Part XX}.

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ABE CLEGG. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 128-129; 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 32.

Alexander, Henry, Place Names and Dialect Study. “In nine cases out of ten the word is then called Celtic, which means that the writer knows nothing at all about it.” Old alternative form e.g. Bickersteth for Bickerstaffe, Lancs., may be preserved in surnames. Some local place-name pronunciations are useful for ascertaining origin. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 24-46.

Anonymous, Ça Ira. “Song of the French Revolution … the marching song of the West Riding Regiment.” Dialect words have been substituted to make a recruiting song. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 13-14.

A Yorkshire Dialogue (1685) – see Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912].

BARNES, WILLIAM, DORSET DIALECT POET and scholar. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 15- 59.

Benham, Charles E., The Essex Dialect. A major article. “Meagre bibliography of the Essex dialect… serious shortcomings…Charles Clark, Great Totham Hall…uniformly gives … ‘ruf’ for ‘roof’ and ‘stud’ for ‘stood’, peculiarities which certainly do not exist in Essex today (but ‘ruf” found in East Sussex – from a man who used to work on roofs – as recently as the 1970s – Compiler). ‘Thussins’…means ‘thus’. ‘Warsley’ [means] ‘inversely’. Richard Stephen Charnock[’s] Glossary (1880) …he was quite unqualified for the undertaking. [In] Joseph Wright’s …Dialect Dictionary… the majority of words which locally would be supposed to belong exclusively to Essex are also met with in far distant counties in precisely the same sense….The distinguishing characteristic of Essex speech is an unaccountable rise in pitch, sometimes by chromatic intervals, sometimes by a sudden leap – up to the minor seventh, at the end of a sentence and particularly of a question. I have urged upon local musicians the extreme desirability of enshrining this extraordinary vagary by making it the theme in the composition of an Essex sonatina” (!) Also quotes three Essex dialect ballads by the author of the article:
1. These New-Fangled Ways:
Geoggerfy! Now what on arth’s the sense,
A larnin’ of em’ how the Moon go roun’?
An’ all about Ameriky an’ Frence,
An plaices tother side o’ Lunnon town?
2. My Booy Jim (A Ballad of Paternal Pride)
3. The Death of Mike (A Ballad of Mournfulness).
1917 {Part XIX Volume III} pp 13-30.

BERLIN, UNIVERSITY OF – see Moorman, F.W., Report for 1912.

BINGLEY DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

CALDER VALLEY DIALECT – see 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

CLEGG, ABE. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 128-129; 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 32.

COCKERMOUTH DIALECT. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 65-70; 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 75-76.

Coffin, A.C., William Barnes, the Dorset Poet. This is a very full account of Barnes’s life and work, including a Book List and long extracts from his dialect verse. Remarks about Barnes’s “naturalness” and “simplicity” need to be valued in relation to the Folklorist obsessions of the time. Likewise his Anglo-Saxon studies “preserving… and … restoring this pure (sic) ancient language and character to England… He was most struck with the purity (sic) of the Welsh language…Chevalier de Chatelian: ‘Votre charmant dialecte était souvent intraduisable. [untranslatable]’ … ‘That word ‘geäte’. That is how King Alfred would have pronounced it’… ” Published in 1849 Se Gefylsta: An Anglo-Saxon Delectus. At his death, A Glossary of Dorset Speech (1886) was incomplete. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 15- 59.

Collett, T.W., Goin’ tu t’Spaws. Poem in dialect, about going on holiday to a “spa” or seaside resort.
…Ye reytch ’hoam a bloomin’ lot
War tired nor at startin’
1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 35-36.

COLNE VALLEY DIALECT – see 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

COWLING DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

Cowling, G.H., The Throssel and the Owl. Poem in dialect.
The brimstone moth and the flittermoos
Flackered roond i’ the pale moonleet.
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} page 71.

Cowling, G.H. A Dree Neet. Revision of an old lyric in dialect in Richard Blakeborough’s T’ Hunt o’ Yatton Brig.
…Ower t’ whinny moor tae trake
Wi’ shoonless feet, ower flinty stains,
Thruff mony a thorny brake.
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 81-83.

Cowling, G.H., “retouched by”, The Staintondale Hunt Song. Mostly not in dialect:
Brave sportsmen were ready to cut through the rocks,
And patience rewarded us there with our fox.
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 16-17.

Cowling, G.H., Book Review of: Idylls of a North Countrie Fair, by Jonathan M. Denwood & John Denwood, Junr. (published by Brash Brothers, Cockermouth 1916). “Faithful phonetic transcription of the [Lakeland] dialect”. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 75-76.

Cowling, George H., The Aims of the Yorkshire Dialect Society. “Professor Moorman … came here as a stranger amongst us from Wales, where doubtless he was influenced by the part which the Welsh language played in the life and character of the people.” 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 16-26.

COWLING HEAD (near SKIPTON) DIALECT. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 87-88.

Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects. Scots revived from its “dormant” state through the work of Ferguson, Burns and Scott, but only a “literary” revival. Frisian (in various forms) confined to Friesland province, enclave by Oldenburg, and west coast of Slesvig – “no literature” except one 17th century poet, but Language Society from 1846. Danish almost always used as the written language in Norway since c.1500 – Ivar Aasen began to study dialects of “country districts” c.1840, gave rise to Landsmaal. Language of the Færöes anciently never written at all – ballad literature – the spelling based on Icelandic, “historical rather than phonetic”. Dialects of Jutland vary considerably from literary Danish (dialect of Sjælland) – author Jeppe Aakjær published collection of Jutlandish texts in 1902 – dictionary of the dialects by Pastor Fejlberg. Volume of poems and songs in the [Frisian] dialect of Sylt. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 7-23.

Craigie, W.A., The late Rev. Professor W. W. Skeat and the late Henry Sweet, Vice-Presidents of the Society. Tributes to two men famous generally in English language and philological studies, Sweet’s contributions being in Anglo-Saxon and Phonetics, Skeat’s, inter alia, in the use of:
(a) Glossary from J.H., Tour to the Caves 1781;
(b) Glossary from Marshall’s Rural Economy of East Yorkshire 1788;
(c) Glossary from the West Riding by Dr Willan 1811;
(d) Glossary of Swaledale words, by Captain Harland 1873;
(e) Supplement to Atkinson’s Cleveland Glossary 1876;
(f) “Thoresby’s letter to Ray” (?);
(g) The York Minster Screen 1833;
(h) A Yorkshire Dialogue 1673;
(i) A Yorkshire Dialogue 1684;
in his English Dialects from the Eighth Century to the Present Day (Cambridge 1911) and his editions of the Rushworth and Lindisfarne Gospels pointing to their Anglian / Northern origins, as well as other linguistic work. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 16-18.

Craigie, W.A., The Historical and Educational Value of Yorkshire Dialect. “It is impossible to conceive what [Sir Walter] Scott could have made of the Antiquary without [the Broad Scots-speaking] Edie Ochiltree, of Old Mortality without Cuddie Headrigg, or of Rob Roy without Andrew Fairservice and Bailie Nicol Jarvie … In Coverdale’s Bible [the dialect word] licken, ‘to trust’ [is used]… [In the 14th century] Yorkshire [dialect] was practically the same (sic) as the speech of Lowland Scotland … to far beyond Aberdeen.” January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 12-26.

CUMBERLAND DIALECT – see LAKELAND.

CUMBRIAN DIALECT – see LAKELAND.

DANBY DALE DIALECT – see Moorman, F.W., Report for 1912.

DANISH OF SJÆLLAND – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 7-23.

DANTE – see Snowden, Keighley, Dialect in Literature.

Denwood, J.M. & John, Junr., At Cockermouth Fair. Dramatic scene with lyrics in Lakeland dialect.
Ah’ll nut forgit t’ furst time we met,
- ’Twas on a Sunday mwornin’, -
For Ah was on my way ta t’ kurk
In aw my best adornin’
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 65-70.

Denwood John, Junr., & Denwood, Jonathan M., A Flock o’ Sheep. Poem in Lakeland dialect. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 21-22.

DORSET DIALECT. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 15- 59.

Drinkwater, John, The Poet and Tradition. No doubt a useful snapshot of critical opinion especially as regards the Georgian Poets of the early 20th century, but only in the final 2 pages, quoting from Yorkshire-born Andrew Marvell, does he mention any Yorkshire connection:
But at my back I always hear
Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near.
1919 {Part XX Volume III} pp 6-21.

Drinkwater, John, Book Review of: Songs of the Ridings by F. W. Moorman (published by Elkin Mathew). “Yorkshire dialect has beckoned from its seclusion to a busy Professor of Leeds University and made him a poet.” 1919 {Part XX Volume III} pp 22-24.

EAST RIDING DIALECT – see Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912].

Editor, Book Review of: A Yorkshire Tyke: Rustic Tunes, mainly in the Doric Mode, by George H. Cowling. (published by Grant Richards Ltd.) December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 125-126.

Editor, Book Review of: Tykes Abrooad, By Walter Hampson (published by W. Nicholson, Wakefield). The world-famous omelettes of Mont St. Michel were “nowt but Yorkshire puddeen made ’baat blatter.” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 126-127.

Editor, Book Review of: Recitations in the Folk-Speech of East Yorkshire, by M. Sowersby (published by R. Jackson, Leeds). “Born 1846, Mr Sowersby lost his sight at the age of twelve.” 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} page 57.

Editor, Book Review of: Rustic Speech and Folk-lore, by Elizabeth Mary Wright (Oxford University Press 1912) “Mrs Wright … one … who has grown up in … contact with the speech of the West-Midland counties … adduces from the Lancashire dialect of today that the author of [the] Middle English poems, Sir Gawayne [and the Green Knight], Pearl, Cleanness, and Patience belonged to that county.” January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 9-10.

Editor, Book Review of: Woz’ls. Humorous Sketches and Rhymes, mostly in the East Yorkshire Dialect, by J.A.Carlill (published by F. Smith, Hull), which includes a short dialect grammar and glossary. January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 10-11.

Editor, Reviews of: 1. The Clock Almanack for 1914, by John Hartley (published by Nicholsons, Wakefield); 2. Bob Stubbs’ Original Comic Yorkshire Awmynack for 1914 (published by Fur and Feather Offices, Idle); 3. The Chimney Nook, 1914, by Sol Darrell, (published by S.Crossland, Kirkgate, Leeds). January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} page 11.

Editor, Editorial. Reports death of John Hartley. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

Editor, draws attention to issues for 1916 of The Original Clock Almanac (its 50th year) and Bob Stubbs’ Yorksher Awmynack. 1815 page 58.

Editor, Book Review of: Plays of the Ridings, by F.W. Moorman (published by Elkin Matthew). Dialect drama. 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 27-30.

Editor: Book Review of: Sir Nicholas Nobbler, Knight, A Modern Hug(h)e-di-Bras: A Satire in Yorkshire Dialect, by W.E.Francis (published by Richard Jackson):
Till Ah wor seven year owd, Ah went to school,
An’ left afoor Ah’s larnt to be a fool.
1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 31.

Editor: Book Review of: Abe Clegg in War Time, by F.J. Newboult (published by Wm. Byles & Sons). 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 32.

ESSEX BALLADS (by Charles Benham, but seemingly “spontaneous”). 1917 {Part XIX Volume III} pp 13-30.

ESSEX DIALECT. 1917 {Part XIX Volume III} pp 13-30.

FAEROES, LANGUAGE OF – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 7-23.

Fayers, George D., The Happy Recruit. Poem in dialect. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} page 15.

Fayers, George Denys, The Charity Dinner: A Yorkshire Dale Sketch. Some dialogue in dialect. 1917 {Part XIX Volume III} pp 8-11.

Fayers, George Denys, The Deacon’s Courtship, A story with dialogue in dialect. “Farmers we read abaart in t’owd Bewk [the Bible] gaate theer asses an’ cammels fer catchin’, an’ if I waant eaven a lile galloway I hev ter pay twenty pund for’t.” 1919 {Part XX Volume III} pp 27-32.

Fayers, George Denys, That Cat o’ Mine. Poem in dialect. 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 40-41.

FÉLIBRIGE (Provençal Dialect/Occitan Language Society) December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 62-64.

FEWSTON DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

Fletcher, J.S., Ont Luce an’ Uncle Simeon. Prose piece in dialect.
“Wheer’s thou sprung from? An’ wheer’s that five shillin’ ’at tha borrowed when tha went away … Theer wor to be a post-office-order sent for it…”1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 23-27.

FRISIAN – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 7-23.

Gowland, Lyng, A Bit o’ Farm Life. Poem in dialect.
An’ mahnd thoo stecks that lowsahde yat
At gans i’ t’ tonnap field…
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 74-76.

Goodall, Armitage, The Scandinavian Element in Yorkshire Place-Names. 1913 pp 28-54. Distinguishes Norse and Danish; words of either Anglian or Scandinavian origin are often exactly alike; identifies -by, carr, keld and lund as Scandinavian without considering the possibility of their adoption into Middle English. Kirk + by is cited as “proof” of Scandinavian origin, despite Domesday Book forms Chirchebi, etc. Reckons over 50 per cent of North Riding names are Scandinavian, though most villages near Malton named in Anglo-Saxon no whit different from forms in southern England (Compiler’s observation); on better ground with traces of Nordic dative plural ending and genitives in –ar. Reports a lost Thingwala or Tingwal, place of assembly, near Whitby (Compiler: Compare Thingoe Hundred near Risby, Suffolk). 1913 pp 28-54.

Grant, William, Recent Work in Scottish Dialects. Till the 16th century, Lowland Scots was termed Inglis, “Scottis” being the language of the Highlanders (Gaelic). Pictish vaguely assigned to Basque/Welsh/Gaelic. Verb takes –s termination in all persons where separated from subject pronoun; “When the kye comes hame” (‘The Ettrick Shepherd’ = James Hogg). Words claimed as distinctively Scottish are shared with English dialects. The sub-divisions of the Scottish dialects differ mostly in pronunciation, vocabulary and intonation (Intonation is not explored). Literary Scots was based “undoubtedly” on the language of the Court at Edinburgh – there was a “polite standard”: speech of Effie Deans in The Heart of Midlothian. Distribution of lists to record local speech in Scotland. Recommended co-operation across the border between Scottish and Northern English dialect enthusiasts. January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 27-44.

GRASSINGTON DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

HACKNESS DIALECT. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 71-74.

Halliday, Wilfred J., T Owd Days. Poem in dialect. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 72-73.

Halliday, Wilfred J., Sally. Poem in dialect.
Shoo nivver grum’led, even when
Shoo’d nowt i’ t’ hahse ta eit.
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 18-20.

Halliday, Wilfred J., Book Review of: Leet Livvy, by J.S.Fletcher (published by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co.). “A first-rate story in good dialect verse.” Written in Osgoldcross dialect:
“An’ theer ne’er wor a brokken pot remaäde to a sound ’un yet.”
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 55-57.

HARTLEY, JOHN. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8. Also see: Moorman, F.W., Some Recent Publications in the Yorkshire Dialect.

HAWSKER DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

HUDDERSFIELD – see Ratchet, Gabriel.

Hyde, F. Austin, Home Thoughts from France. Poem in dialect; mentions “Driffil’”:
Laatle cauves i’d cauf-hoose bealin’
Laatle pigs i’d styes.
1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} page 10.

Jackson, F.G., Dialect Drama. Play in Lancashire dialect has been played with success, while a similar story in Standard English languishes: favourable theatre receptions in previous 2 years of dialect pieces The Upstroke and The Devil’s Star, by “Abe Clegg” (F.J. Newboult). December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 128-129.

Jones, J.D., Historical Notes on the Sheffield Dialect. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 36-48.

JUTLAND DIALECT – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects. 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 7-23.

LAKELAND DIALECT.
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 65-70;
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 21-22;
1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 75-76.

LEEDS DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

List of members:
1911 {Part XII Volume II} pp 39-43.
1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 47-51.
1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 49-53.
January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 51-55.
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 131-136.
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 61-66 .
1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 81-86.
1917 {Part XIX Volume III} pp 31-37 .
1919 {Part XX Volume III} pp 34-40.
1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 43-48.

MASHAM DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

Mawer, Allen, The Late Very Rev.G.W.Kitchin, D.D., Dean of Durham. Tribute to a deceased vice-president of the Y.D.S. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 19-20.

Mawer, Allen, Book Review of: The Dialect of Hackness, by G.H.Cowling (Cambridge University Press 1915). Attempt to trace this N.E. Yorkshire dialect from that of Richard Rolle of Hampole, 14th century. “The [supposed Scandinavian origin] of til takes a lot of killing. The word is found in Cædmon’s Hymn….It is pedantically misleading to speak as if Scandinavian loan-words in English were derived from Icelandic…An interesting and scholarly book.” 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 71-74.

MERITON, GEORGE – see Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912].

Metcalfe, John, Sunny Nancy’s. Prose piece in dialect. “Sometimes they laiked i’ t’ gardin, climm’d up t’apple trees, an’ fell aht on ’em, or tewk an’ ate a fehw sahr apples … they laik’d at twinin t’ bucket up an’ dahn t’ draw-well.” January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 45-47.

MISTRAL, FRÉDERIC. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 62-64.

MONT ST. MICHEL. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 126-127.

MOORMAN, PROFESSOR. passim in: 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 16-26; pp 27-30; death reported page 28

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary. Report for 1911. “What Dr Craigie writes concerning the success [in reviving] an interest in the once decaying (sic) languages of Friesland and Norway applies none the less forcibly to the … efforts … of the Yorkshire Dialect Society…. The chief obligation of membership is the unwearied prosecution of dialect research and the assiduous fostering of dialect speech… The dialect speaker recites or speaks into the tube of the machine and the record is made upon specially-prepared wax plates…The recent publication of Prof. Skeat’s little volume, English Dialects from the Eighth Century to the Present Day (Cambridge University Press).” 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} pp 3-6.

Moorman, F.W., Report for 1912. “[The Society] has purchased a dictaphone … [which] will be put into immediate use, and before long it is hoped that accurate records will be made from genuine dialect speakers … The wax cylinders, bearing the records engraved upon them, will … be carefully stored away in boxes in a room of equable temperature in the University of Leeds.” (Where are they now? – Compiler) “An important contribution to dialect study has been recently made by Dr W. Klein of the University of Berlin. Two years ago Dr Klein spent a long vacation in Danby-dale … The first part of his researches is now published as a doctorate dissertation, bearing the tile, Der Dialekt von Stokesley in Yorkshire” (One of the volumes of Palaestra published for the University of Berlin by Mayer & Müller, Berlin.) 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 3-5.

Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912]. Reports on a “rare” book showing dialect in the 17th century, viz.
“The Praise of Yorkshire Ale,
Wherein is enumerated several Sorts of Drink, with a Description of the Humors of most sorts of Drunkards.
To which is added, a York-shire Dialogue in its pure natural Dialect, as is now commonly spoken in the North parts of York-shire.
With the Addition of some Observations, of the Dialect and Pronunciation of Words in the East Ryding of York-shire.
Together with a Collection of Significant and usefull Proverbs.”
By George Meriton, Gent.
Printed and published at York 1685.
“The poem In Praise of Yorkshire Ale is written in heroic couplet verse … in Standard English”. The writer then goes on to praise and present a portion of what is now the Y.D.S. publication, A Yorkshire Dialogue (1683). “In the Collection of Significant and usefull Proverbs are many which, though common to most parts of England, appear here in a somewhat unusual form…
A reeking House and a Scawding Wife
Will mack yan weary of his Life.”
In the section on East Riding Dialect: (Meriton:) “In some words for oo we pronounce eu, as ceul, feul, eneuf; for cool, fool, enough … se for so; se throng i.e., so full of business.”
“The volume ends with a ‘Clavis’ or Glossary of the dialect words used.” 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 6-9.

Moorman, F.W., Some Recent Publications in the Yorkshire Dialect. Reviews of:
1. Smook thru a Shevvield Chimla, by T’ Stooaker (W. McGowan, Stalwart Office, Pontefract) (The review quotes in full a dialect poem, The Filecutter’s Lament to Liberty);
2. John Hartley’s Original Clock Almanac for 1913 (W. Nicholson, Wakefield);
3. Bob Stubbs’ (W.Saville), Original Comic Yorksher Awmynack for 1913 (Fur & Feather Offices, Idle);
4. Original Tales and Ballads in the Yorkshire Dialect by J. Malham-Dembleby (published by Walter Scott):
(Of the site of Kirkstall Abbey:)
It was a bonnie plat i t’ thwaet,
An grean as t’moss inside a well.
1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 10-15.

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary, Editorial Report. “Phonographic records have been made of the dialect speech of Leeds, Stanningley, Bingley, Cowling, Threshfield, Grassington, Fewston and Wyke (near Harewood), … of Nunnington (near Helmsley), Masham, Staithes, Hawsker, and Robin Hood’s Bay…Perhaps the most pleasing discovery … was the sure hold which the dialect literature has obtained … The poems of Ben Preston, John Castillo, Tom Blackah, Mrs. Tweddell and John Hartley, are as familiar as household words. … Modern plays in which dialect is … introduced: [John] Masefield’s Nan in the Gloucestershire dialect, or Gilbert Cannan’s Miles Dixon in the dialect of the Lake District. … The Society has received the Transactions of the North Frisian Folk-lore Society (Nordfriesisches Verein für Heimatskunde und Heimatsliebe)” January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 4-8.

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary, Editorial. “Mssrs. J.M. and John Denwood … are …engaged in the laudable task of forming a Lake District Dialect Society … There has passed away, at the … age of 84, the greatest dialect-poet that Europe has produced since Burns. I had the honour of an interview with Fréderic Mistral in his Provençal home in Maillane during the last year of his life … the Félibrige – the … Provençal Dialect Society … which Mistral and Roumanille founded.” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 62- 64.

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary, Editorial. “Phonetic transcriptions or dictaphone records have been made of the speech of Upper Wharfedale and of the Colne and Calder Valleys [including Todmorden].” Performances reported of dialect plays by John Metcalfe, A Rum and Tea Doo and T’ Kal ’Oil. Death of John Hartley reported. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

Moorman, F.W., Richard Rolle: the Yorkshire Mystic. “When limestone caves, like that of St. Robert of Knaresborough, were rough hewn into hermits’ cells…Officium de Sancto Ricardo, Heremita, which, after [Richard of Hampole’s] death, his disciples compiled in the expectation of his canonisation…. [Richard Rolle wrote] a Hermit’s Rule…[and] Incendium Amoris…[the] story of [his] illumination…The Form of Perfect Living [written in English for the recluse] Margaret Kirby…Another of his epistles, Ego dormio et cor meum vigilat…. written for a nun in the Benedictine house of Yeddingham … Rolle…was a master of verse and prose and of the Latin and English tongues…[In] the famous Prick of Conscience…[there are] devotional lyrics addressed to Christ and the Virgin Mary:
My salve of my sare sa saryful in syght,
Sa naked and wayled, thi ryg on the rode
Ful hydusly hyngand…
The nuns of Hampole claimed that they alone possessed authentic copies of his writings, and these they kept secure by means of iron chains.” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 89-106.

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary, Editorial. “We are convinced… that our [forthcoming] Anthology [of] Yorkshire dialect poetry … will be most welcome in the trenches and dug-outs of the Somme Valley and the Balkan Peninsula, as well as in the messrooms of … battleships.” 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 5-7.

Moorman, F.W. Some Yorkshire Shibboleths. Comments on the use of “I is” for “I am” (evidenced in Chaucer’s Reeve’s Tale, where one character is from “Strother, far in the north”) and regional Yorkshire pronunciations of “oven”. 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 60-70.

Moorman, F.W., Editorial Secretary, Report for 1916. “The Council decided that a complete copy of the Transactions of the Society from its inception, should be bound…A hearty vote of congratulation to Mr. S.P. Unwin, Chairman of the Council [of Y.D.S.], on the attainment of his 80th birthday.” 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 77-78.

MUSICAL PITCH IN DIALECT SPEECH – see entry for: Benham, Charles E., The Essex Dialect.

NEWBOULT, F.J. (“ABE CLEGG”) December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 128-129; 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 32.

Newboult, F.J., Spring. Poem in dialect.
Ta t’ tips of her finger’s shoo’s wick.
Tha can see t’ pulses beeat i’ her brah.
January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 48-49.

NORTH FRISIAN – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report [for January 1914].

NORTH YORKSHIRE DIALECT – see Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912].

NORWEGIAN LANDSMAAL (Nynorsk) – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects.

NUNNINGTON DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

OCCITAN – see PROVENÇAL.

OSGOLDCROSS DIALECT. 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 55-57.

Parke, A. Irving, Oor Bit. Poem in dialect, about the sacrifice of a young life to World War I. 1917 {Part XIX Volume III}. page 12.

Parke, A. Irving, Nobbut. Poem in dialect.
Aback of a brokken fence, ’at
Yan’s allus ower thrang ti mend.
1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 39.

PIKE COUNTY BALLADS (United States). 1917 {Part XIX Volume III} page 13.

PROVENÇAL. December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 62-64.

PROVERBS (with a local flavour) – see Moorman, F.W., Appendix to Report [for 1912].

Ratchet, Gabriel, Cambodunum. Poem in dialect, using the name of a Roman fort, “on a farm at Slack, near Huddersfield”.
Ay, I know we’re nobbut farmers, mowin’ gerse an’ tentin’ kye,
But we’re praad of all we’ve stood for i’ thease ages at’s gone by.
December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 77 -80.

Ratchet, Gabriel, His Last Sail. Dialogue poem in dialect:
Thoo mun bide at yam ti-neet;
At eighty-two thoo sudn’t think
To gan wi’ t’ fishin’ fleet.
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 12-14.

Ratchet, Gabriel, The Courtin’ Gate. Poem in dialect.
Swallows i’ t’ thack are sleepin’,
An’ t’ neet-hawk’s high on t’ wing.
1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 11-12.

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

SCOTS LANGUAGE.
passim in: January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 12-26;
January 1914 {Part XV Volume III} pp 27-44
Also see: Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects.

SHEFFIELD DIALECT. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 36-48. Also see: Moorman, F.W., Some Recent Publications in the Yorkshire Dialect.

SKEAT, W.W. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 16-18.

Skemp, A.R., Odin and Thor in Old Norse Poetry. Quotes from “Miss Olive Bray’s The Elder Edda, London 1906.”. “Iceland …yielded the greatest of old Teutonic literatures.” 1911 {Part XII Volume II} pp 5-19.

Smith, L. Pearsall, Popular Speech and Standard English. “[A] notion entertained by Dr. Johnson and the older lexicographers…is…that every word should have…an ‘etymo-logy’…Words therefore…new-made out of expressive sound … suffer from a certain prejudice against them.” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 107-124.

Snowden, Keighley, Dialect in Literature. “When a dialect finds literary form, it gains both dignity and vital force. In Italy, a folkspeech used by Dante became a great recognised language.” 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 21- 35.

Snowden, Keighley, Th’ Owd Talk at Cowineead (“Cowling Head, four miles south-west of Skipton”). Prose piece in dialect, concerning the dialect: “We sould niver say, ‘Tha mun do’t if tha can’. What we say is, ‘Tha mun do’t if ta can.’” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 87-88.

S.P.U., mentions Dr Moorman’s The Place-Names of the West Riding of Yorkshire (Vol. XVIII of the Thoresby Society’s Transactions). 1912 {Part XIII Volume II} page 6.

STAITHES DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

STANNINGLEY DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

STOKESLEY DIALECT – see Moorman, F.W., Report for 1912.

SWEET, HENRY. 1913 {Part XIV Volume II} pp 16-18.

Sykes, Sir Mark, Yorkshire Pilgrims (Wold dialect). Poem in dialect:
Jerus’lem toon, it is ta prize
We start ti seek ti-day.
1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 33-34.

SYLT DIALECT (of North Frisian) – see Craigie, W.A., The Revival of Languages and Dialects.

Taylor, Frank J., The Bibliography of Yorkshire Dialect Literature. Much on the more obscure works of the 19th century. (For more bibliography and stray references, also see these present Indexes – Compiler) 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 5-15.

TODMORDEN DIALECT – see 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

Turner, Walter F., A Wold Shepherd. Poem in dialect.
You ax what ah think te this war?
Weel, ah deean’t think mich tiv it mesen.
1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 9-11.

Turner, Walter F., The Good Awd Tahmes. Poem in dialect.
They’re better awaah is t’ good awd tahmes,
Wi their opper an gallusies, lays, an flaals, it was ard dree wark.
1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} pp 8-9.

UNWIN, S. PHILIP, Photograph of a painting of, with coat of arms (Argent, three fleur-de-lis, within a bordure engrailed). 1916 {Part XVIII Volume III} frontispiece.

UPPER WHARFEDALE DIALECT – see 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

Vaughan, Prof. C.E., Echoes of Old English Rhythm in Modern English Poetry. General literary item – identifies a “struggle” post 1200 between the Anglo-Saxon alliterative system and the “French” metres. 1911 {Part XII Volume II} pp 20-38.

WELSH LANGUAGE – see Coffin, A.C. also: 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} page 16.

WHARFEDALE DIALECT – see 1915 {Part XVII Volume III} pp 5-8.

Witty, J.R., How we used to Deal with Wife Beaters in Holderness. Prose piece in dialect, with poem in dialect included. “A card roond neck ‘This is’, whosamivver it be (Bill Ashton it war et Lang Rist’n) an all toon ed ev pans an tins … en ev a processin throoff toon.” December 1914 {Part XVI Volume III} pp 84-86.

Witty,J.R., Eleven Mile up t’River Ooll. Prose piece in dialect concerning the River Hull. “It’s a sloa watther, et cums frev aboot Dhriffil’, past Bevla; an gans intid Oomber beside Ooll Pier.” 1920 {Part XXI Volume III} pp 37-38.

WYKE (near Harewood) DIALECT RECORDING – see Moorman, F.W., Editorial Report for January 1914 pp 4-8.

Yorke, M.A., Breckons. Poem in dialect.
Cotch t’owd meer…
Oppen t’yat, an’ thruff sho’ll gan.
“Bracken is used by the Nidderdale farmer as bedding for his horses and cattle…he brings it down the steep hillsides on a sledge.” 1919 {Part XX Volume III} pp 25-26.

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