0 items - £0.00 0
  • No products in the cart.

An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1971-1980

“Mair … aboot it bairn was writ
Than ivver hez been fairly read thruff yit”

York Minster Screen (Y.D.S. Publications)

The doctor gave me the names of over-the-counter products, but i didn’t want to go through with any of it. We analyzed the genomic https://saiheritagebanquet.com/94565-map-69237/ sequences of 10 clinical isol. This provides some protection, but not as much as the more potent antihistamine.

Penyembutan menyumbangi keluar dan penyembutan menjadi kehidupan sekalipun. Buy clomid online, clomid-2, clomid-5, clomid-6, clomid-8 and serve la ricetta per il cialis generico clomid-9 are also available without a prescription in most countries. The price you pay depends on a variety of factors including, but not limited to: the cost of the medicine, its form and strength, and the dosage prescribed.

Compiler’s Note: The passage of time has meant that items in the Transactions are less likely to be remembered or the background known. Therefore, with this index I have quoted rather more and attempted to summarise and cross-reference the articles that make a significant contribution to dialect study. This of course has made this index somewhat larger than the others. When an item has no author assigned, I list it under the name of the Editor, in round brackets, thus: (Ellis, Stanley).

ALSATIAN GERMAN DIALECT – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

AMERICAN (U.S.) AND CANADIAN DIALECTOLOGY: “ ‘Dialect’ in the European sense is much less common in America than in England.” – see Viereck, Wolfgang, especially pp 34-36. Anderson, P., Book Review: D. Wilson, Staffordshire Dialect Words: A Historical Survey, Moorland Publishing Co., 1974. “I would like to know for instance whether the words bass – ‘slatey coal’ … and delf-hole – ‘a pit shaft’ belong strictly to the mining community or to the general dialect.” [The root delf seems to be at least as old as the placenames Dilhorne and Biddulph – the compiler]. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 54-55.

Anderson, Peter M., A New Light on Early English Pronunciation (an 1889 survey by A.J.Ellis). “The persons who filled in the questionnaires were generally not dialect speakers themselves.” Ellis feared to go among the people himself, as he opined that they would use a “refined” pronunciation when speaking to him. Anderson regards e.g. transcriptions for Leeds, Keighley and Bradford to be fairly accurate, and advocates caution when using Ellis’s material. maps pp 36 & 37. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 32-41.

Anderson, P.M., Book Review of R. McDavid’s Dialects in Culture. (University of Alabama Press 1979). Articles by a “foremost … United States … dialectologist.” 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 53-55.

ASIA POLYGLOTTA (1823: J. Klaproth) – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

ATLAS LINGUISTIQUE DE LA FRANCE (1902-1910) – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

BAVARIA, DIALECTS OF – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

BECKERY [from Old Irish Becc Ériu, “Little Ireland” – the compiler], Somerset. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 48.

Beer, Doris, T’Supermart. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 32.

Beer, Doris, Fleein Cops. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 46.

Beer, Doris, Stamped On.
Poem in West Riding dialect. “Mail from Halifax, the writer’s home, now
goes to Huddersfield for franking”:
It’s guessin weer yon letter’s from
At mecks it all se nice.
1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 11.

Beer, Doris, Foggy. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 12.

Beer, Doris, Shinn’d Off. Poem in West Riding dialect concerning the great drought of 1976. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 35. 4

Beer, Doris, Flaar Paar (Flower Power). Poem in West Riding dialect. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 35.

Beer, Doris, Flattened. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 8.

Beer, Doris, Chimleys, Poem in West Riding dialect, on the disappearance of factory chimneys. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV}. p 47.

BEVERLEY, DIALECT OF. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 7-33.

“BILL O’TH HOYLUS END” Keighley dialect writer – see Copley, J., especially p 12ff.

BLACK COUNTRY DIALECT (as element of “STAFFORD-SHIRE”). 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 54-55.

BLACK ENGLISH of the U.S.A. Controversies mentioned. – see Viereck, Wolfgang, especially p 38.

Brown, Fred, Of Blessed Memory. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 9-10.

Brown, Fred, Scripture Lesson (Apocryphal), Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 10-11

Brown, Fred, The Entertainers, Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 11.

Brown, Fred, “Caller Herring”, Poem in West Riding dialect. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 47. 5

Brown, Fred, Supply and Demand. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 47.

Brown, Fred, “Open Thou mine Eyes” . Poem in West Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 32.

Brown, Fred, Death of a Soldier – 1914. Poem partly in West Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 33.

Brown, Fred, Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 46.

BROWN, FRED, Yorkshire Dialect Poet. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 49-52; 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 51.

Campbell, W.H., High Carbon Steel. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 40.

Carter, F.A., Wensleydale Talk Back. Poem in dialect:
Us farmer chaps
Has ower mich ti dew
To spend wer time i-gawpin’ roond
Just tackin’ stock o’t’view.
1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 21 -22.

Carter, F.A., Lewkin For’ard. Poem in North Riding dialect:
Yah skylark disn’t mak a spring.
1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 48.

Charlesworth, Douglas, T’Owd Bass Fiddle, Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 12-13.

Charlesworth, Douglas, October. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 13-14. 6

Charlesworth, Douglas, T’Stithy. Poem in West Riding dialect:
Dinning, dinning daan t’Dale,
I’t’smithy t’stithy tells its tale.
1972 p 49.

Charlesworth, Douglas, T’Laylock Tree. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 48.

Charlesworth, Douglas, T’Woodpecker Tapping. Poem in West Riding dialect:
A fair-heeaded lassie coom maundering by
E-singing sa sweetly e-lang t’bridle-sty [path]
1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 13.

Copley, J. The Portrayal of Dialect in Wuthering Heights and Shirley. “In spite of the differences between the two [Brontë] sisters, both were able to indicate the dialect … with accuracy. Emily and Charlotte knew the local speech of Haworth well.” 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 7-16. CORNISH ENGLISH DIALECT AND CUSTOMS. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 45.

CORRINGHAM WAPENTAKE, Lincolnshire, dialect of. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 19.

CORSICAN DIALECTOLOGY – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

DALESMAN’S LITANY, A, “Frae Hull , an’Halifax, an Hell, Gooid Lord deliver me.” 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 11.

DEVON DIALECT – see Smith, J.B. 7 Dickinson, C.A., Iron Rations. Prose piece in dialect: Sither, tak t’brass an ah’ll say noa mooar abaht it. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 46-47.

“DISAPPEARING REFERENT” – lack of recognition of “bilberry” in Norfolk dialect research – see Viereck, Wolfgang, especially pp 29-30.

DORSET DIALECT – see Smith, J.B. Dyson, B.T., Notes on the West Riding Dialect Almanacs. Contains extracts and time chart of pub- lications (pages 40 and 41). Facsimile of title page of Tommy Toddles’s Comic Olmenac page 42. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 24-48.

Dyson, C., Flossie’s Fish. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 14.

EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 19.

ELLIS, A.J. compiler of 835-page guide (1889) to “the different forms … assumed by the descend- ents of the same original word in passing through the mouths of uneducated people … where Eng- lish is the ordinary medium of communication between peasant and peasant.” 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 32-41.

Ellis, J.W., Whitsun i’ t’ Glen. Poem in West Riding dialect:
It’s Whitsuntide i’ Shipley Glen.
1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 36.

E(llis), S(tanley), Book Review: Martyn F. Wakelin, editor, Patterns in the Folk Speech of the British Isles, Athlone Press, London 1972. Scottish, Ulster and S.E.Wales 8 dialects are mentioned. Among contributors to the book are named Mssrs Widdowson, Gregg, Mather, Tilling, Barry, Parry, Peter Wright, and Miss Duncan. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 55-57.

(Ellis, Stanley), Book Review: Peter Wright, The Lanky Twang, Dalesman Books 1972: In the mid- dle of all that funny stuff, he’ll find some pretty good Lancashire. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 57.

Ellis, Stanley, Place-Names in Ryedale. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 16-23.

Ellis, Stanley, Wilfrid J. Halliday, Tribute and biography. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 5-8.

E(llis), S(tanley), Book Reviews of: Colin Simms, Horcum and other Gods; Headland Publications’ Roots; a book of poems by YDS contributor Michael Park; and the book Lang Sarmons by Arthur Jarratt in East Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 55.

Ellis, Stanley, Harold Orton 1898-1975. Tribute and biography. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 5-7.

E(llis), S(tanley), Book Reviews of: Mabel F. Harrison, Spring Cam T’Clattergate, Dialect Poetry of Airedale, published by the author at Yeadon, and Harold Smith, Cloth Cap and Muffler: Poems and Stories in the West Riding Dialect, published by the author at Bradwell. “Both these books give lots of material for those who like to perform.” 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 53. 9

(Ellis, Stanley), Book Reviews of: James Lloyd Jones, Jimmy Jones’s Tyldesley, published by George Smith and Sons (Tyldesley) Ltd, “splendid Lancashire verse”, Michael Park, Straight Rooads, Yorkshire dialect verse, published by Rannoch Gillamoor Poets, Scarborough, and Ha- rold Smith, More Cloth Cap and Muffler, poems and stories in the West Riding dialect, published by the author. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 43-44.

E(llis) S(tanley), Book Reviews of: K.C.Phillipps, Westcountry Words and Ways, published by David and Charles, Newton Abbot (dealing mostly with Cornish phenomena), Peter Wright, Lancashire Dialect, published by Dalesman Publishing, and G. Edward Campion, Lincolnshire Dialects, pub- lished by Richard Kay, Boston, Lincs. “Ted Campion has a passionate interest in Lincolnshire lan- guage and traditions and his obvious enthusiasm is infectious.” 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 45-46.

(Ellis, Stanley), Book Reviews of: Doris Beer, Med i’ ’Alifax, published by Ridings Publishing Co., Driffield, Kate Glover, Yorkshire Brass, published by Solaprint, Pudsey, and Wm E. Fall, Tom Boyes, Deealsman, published by the author, Whitby.
“These books continue the tradition becoming established of dialect authors publishing and dis- tributibng their own works. The Society’s Council long felt that they could not fairly publish works by a single author.” 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 47-48.

(Ellis, Stanley), Book Review, with illustration, of: Richard Scollins & John Titford, Ey Up Mi Duck, “In rollicking and yet erudite vein … about Erewash Valley Dialect”. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 49. 10

Ellis, Stanley, Book Reviews of: Kate Glover, T’Joy of Livin’ i’ Yorkshire, published by Solaprint, Stanningley, Pudsey, Ray Burrows, Beckery Burrows, published by the author, Street, Somerset, Ey Up Mi Duck (Part Three), by Scollins & Titford, Ilkeston, and Martyn Wakelin, Discovering Eng- lish Dialects, published by Shire Publications: “Beckery Burrows …[is] a really good, evocative book ..,. of history, of life in a Somerset village.” . 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 48.

Ellis, Stanley, Record Review of: Ey Up Mi Duck: A Celebration of Derbyshire. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 49.

EREWASH VALLEY DIALECT. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV}. p 49.

Evans, William, The Survival of the Second Person Singular in the Southern Counties of England. Early disappearance of “thou” forms in Kent, Surrey, Sussex [“It was heard only in childhood from the oldest speakers” in Survey of English Dialects], but some survival in Southwest. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 17-29.

EXMOOR DIALECT – see Smith, J.B.

FRENCH DIALECTOLOGY – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

GAELIC (IRISH). 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 29-40.

GILLIÉRON, JULES, Swiss linguist and dialectologist – see Viereck, Wolfgang. Glover, J.B., God’s Garden. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 37. 11 Glover, Kate, Summer’s Song. . Poem in West Riding dialect. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 48.

Green, A.E., Folk-Song and Dialect. : An in-depth essay, quoting examples of popular ballad from Rottingdean, Sussex, Catfield, Norfolk, and Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, but without any marked dialectal features: “Ever since Herder, the term Volkslied/Folk-song has connoted a close relationship between the song on the one hand, and on the other the peasantry – actual or so-called – viewed in that char- acteristically Romantic way as the only perpetuators of the true, unsullied, indigenous culture, and the only surviving representatives of a once organically-unified Volk or People … How little folk- song has been subjected to linguistic analysis … A prima facie case exists for classifying as oral texts certain [Middle English] poems extant in medieval manuscripts … My whole discussion has been based on the virtual absence of dialect from the mainstream of the English folk-song tradi- tion.” 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 20-46 including notes.

HALLIDAY, WILFRID J. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 5-8.

Harrison, M.F., There’s Nowt soa Queer as Fowk. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 51.

Harrison, M.F., Sunrise at Scarbro’. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 38.

Harrison, M.F., When Buzzers Blew. Poem in West Riding dialect concerning the weaving industry. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 39. 12

Harrison, M.F., Common Market Talk. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 9.

Hedger, Ruth, Pensioner Patient on her Surgeon. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 47-48.

HOMONYMIC CONFLICT: “In that [Gascon] area, where, phonetically speaking, homonymy of cattus and gallus was to be expected, we find other designations for ‘cock’ [gallus] like viguier or faisan.” – see Viereck, Wolfgang, especially pp 28-29.

Huddleston, John, An Oliday i Brid (Bridlington). Poem in West Riding dialect. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 40.

Huddleston, John, Aar Church Outin. Poem in West Riding dialect:
Shi tells mi as t’wife er yon new Vicar
Woant av us singin in t’coach,
Nor av us stopping at t’pub i Redcar ….
1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 41.

IRISH GAELIC. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 29-40.

ITALIAN DIALECTOLOGY – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

Jackson, F.E., Ruins. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 5.

Jackson, F.E., Visitor. . Poem in East Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 14. 13

Jackson, F.E., Awd Dad. Prose piece in East Riding dialect. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 16.

Jackson, F.E., Disaster. Prose piece in dialect, concerning death of bird chicks in a nesting box. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 53.

Jackson, F.E., Tawd Cat. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 14.

Jackson, F.E. Maggie. Poem in East Riding dialect:
…Ahd feel moor at yam,
An ah dea like a rasher o good ooam fed am. 1976
{ Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 37.

Jackson, F.E., Martha. Poem in dialect. 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. p 38.

Jackson, F.E., Taties. Poem in East Riding dialect concerning potato farming. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 49.

Jackson, F.E., Ruins. Poem in East Riding dialect:
Thi flagged floors war covered wi pricked rugs fer weary feet.
1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 50.

Jackson, F.E., Sally. Prose piece in East Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 29.

Jackson, F.E., Bonfire Neet 1972. Poem in East Riding dialect concerning the annual November commemoration, through letting off fireworks and making bonfires, of the 17th 14 century Gunpowder Plot. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 33-34.

Jarrat(t), Arthur, Death Bell. Poem in dialect. The church bell at the funeral tolls for each year of the deceased person’s life, and the writer is surprised to count 24. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 50-51.

Jarratt, Arthur, Last Will and Testament. Prose passage in dialect. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 7.

Jarratt, Arthur, Kidcatcher. Poem in dialect:
Oor Johnny’s larnin nowt at skeeal,
He’s mair use here on farm.
1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. p 39.

Jefferson, Gordon, Cahntin Sheep. Poem in dialect inspired by a Y.D.S. discussion on sheep- counting numerals, yaena, taena, pimp, dix, etc. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 42.

Kellett, Arnold, When Ah were a Lad. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 51-52.

Kellett, Arnold, Country Christmas. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 34.

Kellett, Arnold, A Bradford Lad’s Lament. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 47.

Kellett, Arnold, Talking Posh. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 50.

Kellett, Arnold, Dutiful Visit. Poem in West Riding dialect:
An appen Ah’ll finnd thee some spice (sweets). 1978
{ Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 43. 15

KENT DIALECT – see North, David.

KURATH, HANS, American dialectologist – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

LANCASHIRE DIALECT. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 57., 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 43.

Leith, Richard, Book Review: J.C.Hotten, The Slang Dictionary 1887 edn, reissued by E.P.Publishing, Wakefield. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 58-59.

Leith, Richard, Book Review: Martyn Wakelin, English Dialects: An Introduction, Athlone Press, London (1972). 1972 {Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 60-62.

LINCOLNSHIRE DIALECT &c. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 45-46. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 19-23.

McDAVID, R, 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 53-55.

MacMahon, M.K.C., A Glimpse of Beverley Dialect in the Early 18th Century. From “6 [grubby] bundles of Accounts or Receipts relating to Beverley Corporation 1723-1728”:
Booteing and wagaine – boating and waggoning
Gavle boards – boards for the gables of buildings
1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 7-33.

Manley, Sandra M., Pale T’Guilp Off. Alternative suggestion for phrase found in Emily Brontë and the Haworth Dialect (Y.D.S. book publication) 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 25-28. 16

MANLEY WAPENTAKE, Lincolnshire, dialect of. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 19.

MARBURG INSTITUTE OF DIALECTOLOGY:
“One cannot assume that the content of a word is precisely the same in all dialects. Responses to the question about ‘earthen pot’ … reveal that, generally speaking, language does not consider the material in designating pots. What is important is the form of the pot, its size, and what it is used for.” – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

Martin, Sydney, They are Bringing Hudson’s Name back to York … Prose piece in dialect: E warn’t arf a big man thoo knaws, an e wor t’boss on more than a thoosan mahles a railways yance ower. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 16-17.

Martin, Sydney, Amos an George Sattle T’Humber Bridge Job. Prose piece in dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 29-30.

Martin, Sydney, All Change … Poem in dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 35.

Martin, Sydney, Gan Tiv It… Poem in dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 52.

Martin, Sydney, The Windfall. Prose piece in dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 52.

Martin, Sydney, Yorkshire Pudding. Poem in dialect:
At neet we all wad gan off yam
Ti ev some Yorkshire Puddin.
1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 15. 17

Martin, Sydney, Puddin Luv … Poem in dialect:
If yer marry oor Ted,
Can yer mak im a good Yorkshire pud?
1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 10.

Martin, Sydney, Coonthry Smells. Poem in dialect. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. p 44.

Martin, Sydney, Wartahme Memories o’ Whitby. Prose passage in dialect. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 45-46.

Martin, Sydney, Battle of Stamford Bridge – 1066 and All That … Poem in dialect 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. pp 40-41.

Martin, Sydney, Up o’ t’ Moors. Poem in dialect 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. p 41.

MITHRIDATES (Johann Christoph Adelung) – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

MOORMAN, FREDERIC. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 11-18.

MUCKLEBACKIT – see Ogden, James.

MUNDARTEN BAYERNS, GRAMMATISCH DAR-GESTELLT (1821: Johann Andreas Schmeller) – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

NEW ENGLAND DIALECT – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

NORFOLK, folk-song from – see Green, A.E.

NORMANDY – the /k/ -/š/ line – see Viereck, Wolfgang. 18

North, David, Some Linguistic and cultural Boundaries in South-East English (Kent, Surrey, Sus- sex):
Turnrist – one-way ploughs for steep land
Pratt – plough beam-end
Reest – mouldboard
Sussex, Surrey and Kent Wagons
Dat/that, dere/there: boundaries
Weald (“wild”) versus Downland
Denn (outlying pasture) versus fold
and similar topics. 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. pp 8-37.

North, Gordon Allen, York Minster Plain, Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 15.

North, Gordon Allen, Mary, Poem in West Riding dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 16.

North, Gordon Allen, The Moor Line, Poem in West Riding dialect:
It’s curve o’t’ moor Ah cum ta see.
1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 16-17.

North, Gordon Allen, The Leathers Championship. Prose account concerning an older game of throwing skill, with the dialogue in dialect:
Ah didn’t think they laiked it up Cleckyetton way.
1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 9- 16.

North, Gordon Allen, High Wind in Coddle. Prose account set in the Pennine village of Coddle con- cerning the revival of a brass band, with the dialogue in dialect:
“Ah wor t’second bag man for t’ Little Warpington Silver nigh on thotty ye’r.”
1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 24- 28. 19

North, Gordon Allen, The Old Textile Worker. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 49.

North, Gordon Allen, Lark in Spring. Poem in West Riding dialect:
Are ta I toyt?
Then clear thi throyt …
Start singin, do!
1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 16.

North, Gordon Allen, John. Poem in dialect, marked “ER” – but see above. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 40.

North, Gordon Allen, A Breet Yolla Dot. Poem in dialect, marked “ER” – but see above. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 40.

North, Gordon Allen, Ah can’t put i Wods … Poem in dialect, marked “ER” – but see above. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 41.

NORTHUMBRIAN BURR. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 12-15.

Ogden, James, A Specimen of Runswick Dialect in 1829: “[The writer] may be influenced by similar conversations among Scottish dialect speakers in Scott’s novels; for example those among the Mucklebackit family in The Antiquary.” 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 16-18.

Ogden, James, Dialect in Whitby Periodicals. Snippets from five 19th century Whitby newspapers. 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV}. pp 30- 37. 20

ORTON, HAROLD. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 5-7. portrait p 5.

Pahlsson, Christer, Some Notes on the Origin of the Northumbrian Burr . The “jarring of the throat” or “wharle” (Defoe) which is the shibboleth of the pronunciation of the letter R in Northumberland. No serious origin is offered! 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 12-15.

Park, Michael, T’Environment. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 52.

Park, Michael, Rainin Agin. Poem in North Riding dialect:
T’watter’s fair silin off t’roof tops,
An foamin away doon t’drains
1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 53.

Park, Michael, Retirement. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 36.

Park, Michael, Bletherskites. Poem in North Riding dialect:
Him at shoots oot loodest
Is rarely t’yan that’s reet.
1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 36.

Park, Michael, Just Afooar Dawn. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p 37.

Park, Michael, Three Seaside Views. Poem in North Riding dialect. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 17. 21

Park, Michael, Autumn Leaves. Poem partly in North Riding dialect:
Thoo might think leaves a boon,
Bud Ah doot thoo’d sing a different tune
If thoo hed ti sweep em up!
1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. p 18.

Park, Michael, Cromwell’s Defeat at Scarborough. Poem in North Riding dialect:
Big Mabel an’ Ben, they were Royalists,
An’ maist fooak i’ t’ toon they were t’same,
They couldn’t stand t’seet o’ owd Cromwell,
An’ hated t’soond of his name.
1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 38-39.

PEACOCK, E.W. of Brigg, Lincolnshire, dialect investigator. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 19-23.

POTTERIES (Stoke on Trent area) DIALECT (as an element of “STAFFORDSHIRE”). 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 54-55.

PRESTON, BEN. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 34-46.

“RHENISH FAN” – problems of strict division between “Low German” and “High German” dialect – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

Roberts, J. Varley, Poplar House, Stanningley. Prose passage in dialect (autobiographical). 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 23-24.

Roberts, J. Varley, Early Recollections. Prose piece in dialect:
Nobbut a toathri streets up t’road thra where we lived wor a avercake [oatcake] baker name o Webster.
1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. pp 17-18

.

Roberts, J. Varley, Random Reminiscences. Prose piece in West Riding dialect: Ay, and that war just afore t’power lewms cam in which browt ruination to mi grandfather and wiart dart [without doubt] to mony other andlewm [handloom] fowk, all-ararnd. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 21-23.

ROLLE OF HAMPOLE, RICHARD, mystic and writer in Middle English. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 16.

Shackleton, Muriel, Goin’ ta School. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. p 42.

Shackleton, Muriel, ’Eather Time. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1979 { Pt.LXXIX. Vol.XIV }. p 42.

Shackleton, Muriel, February Blues. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 52.

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. Warwickshire-born London playwright. SHAKESPEARE JAHRBUCH. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 14; p 22.

SKEAT, W.W. 19th century dialect and linguistic investigator. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. p 19, p 21.

“SLAVONIC LITHUANIAN” – see Viereck, Wolfgang, especially p.22. 23

Smith, J.B., Oral Tradition in the South-West of England. Long quotations from old countryman informant(s) of the region. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 8-15.

Smith, Jane H., Love, Bob. Poem in North Riding dialect:
Ah doant tek t’trouble
Ter bi spick an span
When thoo’s nut at yam.
1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 17-19.

Smith, K.E., Fred Brown – Poet of Today. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 49-52.

Smith, K.E., T’ Northern Democrat. Poem in West Riding dialect. A plea for Northern Home Rule. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 41.

Smith, K.E., Domains of Dialect Literature: A Socio-Linguistic Approach. Explores the perpetual imprecision of the terms “language” versus “dialect”, and the social domains in which dialect writ- ing in the English and Scottish context has seemed most acceptable. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 24-31.

Smith, K.E., The Dialect Poetry of Tennyson. The seven Lincolnshire dialect poems sometimes reveal imperfectly remembered dialect, such as importing “southernisms” such as “hond” and “darter”, but “Tennyson reveals himself as a true dialect poet rather than a scholarly experimenter.” 1978
{ Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 8-15. 24

Smith, K.E., Ben Preston and his Time and Ours. Bradford’s “poet of the Poor” during the period of rapid growth of the city:
It ur misty, an frosty, an dark as a booit …
1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. pp 34-46.

Smith, Ken Edward, Man o Peace. Poem in West Riding dialect about Yorkshire dialect poet Fred Brown (1893-1980). 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 51.

SOMERSET DIALECT – see Smith, J.B.

SOUTHWEST ENGLAND, DIALECTS OF – see Smith, J.B.

STAFFORDSHIRE DIALECT. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 54-55.

Stark, Kathleen, T’Lahtle Robin, Poem in dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. p 20.

Stark, Kathleen, River Ouse. Poem in dialect. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 20-21.

Stark, Kathleen, East Riding. Poem in East Riding dialect: But we’ve oor gowlden cornfields, wide spread Wauds (Wolds)… 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 42.

Stark, Kathleen, Rowan Tree. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 42.

Stark, Kathleen, Wheat. Poem in East Riding dialect. 1980 { Pt.LXXX. Vol.XV }. p 52. 25

Stead, Jennifer, Dialect in a Druggist’s Diary: Huddersfield 1815-1851. Entries of a “quack aurist” reveal dropping of aitches, some dialect words and local pronunciations (Honley). 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 42-46.

SURREY DIALECT – see North, David.

SUSSEX DIALECT – see North, David. Folk-song from Rottingdean – see Green, A.E.

TENNYSON, ALFRED, DIALECT POETRY – 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 8-15.

Todd, Loreto, Tyrone English: The Influence of Gaelic on Tyrone English. 1971 { Pt.LXXI. Vol.XIII }. pp 29-40.

TYRONE ENGLISH – see Todd, Loreto.

Viereck, Wolfgang (University of Graz, Austria), The Growth and Present State of Dialectology. “The numerous aspects of the phenomenon of language require different methods of study”. See also the interesting items from this article referred to throughout this index. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 19-45.

Wade, Gwen, T’Croft. Prose piece in West Riding dialect:
There’s a deal o’ mucky watter’ll ev to gooa dahn Brafforth Beck afore Ah gets mah croft. 1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 30-31.

Wade, Gwen, Lyke-Wake Dirge. On the Death of the Ridings April 1st 1974. Parody of medieval lyric in West Riding dialect lamenting the redrawing of the boundaries of local 26 government, and the loss of the “Thirdings” or Ridings into which the shire had historically been divided:
But to ‘Humberside’ thoo comes at last,
An t’Divil tak thi sawl.
1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 50.

Wade, Stephen, Riding t’Steng. Prose piece in West Riding dialect. “The steng” is apparently a piece of wood on which somebody popularly identified as a malefactor (in this case, courting a married woman) is made to ride while being pelted with mud, turf. etc. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 19.

Wade, Stephen, Dialect Literature – True and False. Attempting to write in dialect: the author be- lieves in avoiding the more arcane and defunct dialect vocabulary. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. pp 30-34.

Wade, Stephen, A Glossarian at Work: E.W.Peacock of Brigg. 19th century indefatigable collector of Lincolnshire (Parts of Lindsey) dialect.
Ails – 1. handles by which a plow is steered; 2. the handles of a barrow; 3. sticks of barley and wheat; 4. horns of the moon: “It will be dry now the moon ligs ails up-ards.” 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 19-23.

Waddington-Feather, John, Professor F.W.Moorman (1872-1919). Devon-born Frederic Moorman, translator the rules of Soccer into German, introduced dialect writing in the till-then purely academ- ic pages of Y.D.S. Transactions, which he edited, and produced a dialect drama in the public thea- tre, as well as establishing the English Department in what became the University of Leeds. 1977 { Pt.LXXVII. Vol.XIV }. pp 11-18. Photo of F.W.Moorman on page 12. 27

Waddington-Feather, John, Regional Speech and the Yorkshire Novelist. “ ‘Ellen, shut the window, I’m starving.’ (Wuthering Heights) … ‘To be starved’ in the Keighley area is to be very cold. … ‘This Na, which must once have been Now , is the recognised salutation in Bruddersford.’ ” (J.B.Priestley, The Good Companions). 1978 { Pt.LXXVIII. Vol.XIV }. pp 16-29.

Waller, M.T., Stellar Performer. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1975 { Pt.LXXV. Vol.XIII }. pp 19-20.

Wallin, Anne, Mi Owd Schooil Mate. Poem in West Riding dialect. 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. p 51.

WENKER, GEORG, German dialectologist – see Viereck, Wolfgang.

WESTCOUNTRY DIALECT AND CUSTOMS. 1976 { Pt.LXXVI. Vol.XIV }. p 45.

Whiteoak, Glyn, T’Tele. Poem in West Riding dialect concerning the habit of television-watching and the loss to children’s games. 1972 { Pt.LXXII. Vol.XIII }. p 54.

Whiteoak, Glyn, Appiness. Poem in West Riding dialect:
Mi babby’s face, mahth open wide,
Just when Ah pop a spice inside.
1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. p38.

WHITE ROSE GARLAND, THE (W.J.Halliday) 1974 { Pt.LXXIV. Vol.XIII }. pp 5-8.

W(iddowson), J.D.A., Book Review: J.S.Johnson, The Nagars of Runswick Bay, Hub Publications, Youlgreave, 28

Derbyshire 1973. Reminiscences and old customs. “Nagar” is apparently a local slang word for an inhabitant of this village near Whitby. Compared dialect terms, on the authority of the reviewer:
Runswick Bay: ploagin’ = Filey: scrattin’ / sand pokin’
Runswick Bay: waps = Filey: dags
Runswick Bay: mucking = Filey: cavin’
Runswick Bay: kessen bowls = Filey: kessent things
1973 { Pt.LXXIII. Vol.XIII }. pp 39-40.

WREDE, FERDINAND – see Viereck, Wolfgang

Visit our Facebook page

Follow us on Twitter