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An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1941-1950

An earlier time, the preoccupations of a different era, and the much more weighty items found in Transactions, suggest a slightly different approach to indexing for this and the following decade. We are more anxious to point out any references to those who contributed to the work of the Society in former times, as well as any scrap of writing that is theirs. We have indexed in finer detail within the body of articles, picking out names of places as well as sources of information that are the more likely, given the passage of years, to be forgotten. We have again attempted to explain concepts that lie within regional-cultural peculiarities, even when known in other U.K. regions, for the benefit of any who have reading-knowledge of English as an international medium. Wartime conditions meant that the sequence of Transactions seems to have run somewhat late: for instance, the 1944 edition appears to have been produced in late 1945. What is remarkable, however, is that, despite the very desperate conditions recounted in the editorials of those years, there was no break in the publication of Transactions. What is more, the compiler senses that, despite – or perhaps even because of – the perils and uncertainties, and enforced exile of so many Yorkshire people over that period, there was a heightened appreciation of dialect and local identity. However, another effect was to create an uncertainty about which Transactions apply to which year: to re-establish the pattern, 1948 per se has been omitted, its contents included in “1949” – but the Part and Volume numbering proceed in a continuous series.

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The Transactions for 1940 {Part XLI. Volume VI} did not appear until April 1941, and the contents are therefore listed in this index, as well as in the index for 1931-40.

 

ACCOUNTS. STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS AND BALANCE SHEET for 31st December 1943 (assets were 182 pounds 11 shillings and 7 pence!). 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 25.
Also: (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 43.
Also: (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} page 27.
and in subsequent issues.

ACH-Y-FI (Welsh exclamation – see Dylan Thomas, Under Milk Wood) see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

Ackerley, Archdeacon F.G., The Use and Abuse of Phonetics. “When I come to an English dialect – a variety of West Riding Yorkshire – I know that my intonation is at fault, though I can recognise the authentic tone of a good dialect speaker…Hooks and ticks and dots…producing the appalling script which the English Dialect Society used in their publications …Glossic monstrosities. …I could not make out whether this Pickering man [on the wireless / radio] was aspirating his ‘p’s and ‘t’s or making the contact of the lips in one case, of the tongue and gum in the other, more than usually firm so that the explosive effect of the two consonants was enhanced…I know the pronunciation all right, but I cannot get hold of the tune.” 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} pp 12-22.

ALLITERATIVE MORTE ARTHURE (Middle English text). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

ANCREN RIWLE (Middle English text, possibly Herefordshire – Compiler). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

ATKINSON, CANON J.C. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 18- 19; page 23.

BAILDON, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

Bailes, John Lloyd, A Vocabulary of Marbles. (Marbles = a children’s competition game played with small stone or glass balls). Describes how the games are played, and the terms used, e.g. stoggie, marrididdle, peedee, ginger, in different localities. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 12-23.

BAINBRIDGE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

BARNSLEY “HORSE” / “DONKEY” – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

Bartlett, Archdeacon D.M.M., Speech Survival: Little Known Forms of Speech Still Surviving. Deals with private languages (bargemen on Ellesmere Canal, miners’ jargon), Vagrants’ Cant, Romanes (Romany), Shelta (Sheldru, Tinkers’ Talk). 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

Bayford, E.G., F.R.E.S., Notes on the E(nglish) D(ialect) D(ictionary). Complains that “Ach-y-fi” in Pembrokeshire English was not identified as a common Welsh exclamation (“probably of L(ow) G(erman) origin”); “nipsey-money” not in the E.D.D. connected with the game Nipsy played in South Yorkshire; “poppo” children’s word for “horse” (not “donkey”, which is “Neddy”) at Barnsley (not recognised by expert on Scots dialect, Davidson Cook, F.S.A.(Scot.); refers to Wadsley Jack, or the Humours and Adventures of a Travelling Cutler, with dialect dialogue, Leader & Sons, Sheffield 1866 and 1881; refers to dialect writer Tom Treddlehoyle, and to Haigh’s Glossary of the Huddersfield Dialect. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

BEOWULF. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

BORGARFJÖRÐUR DISTRICT (Iceland). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 12-13.

BRER RABBIT. 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 20.

BROMYARD, of Cambridge. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 10-11.

Bruff, Harold J.L., Hon. Secretary’s Report. “…One public meeting, called with some doubt, as it was thought that travelling difficulties and the black-out might prevent members from attending.”(1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} Bruff, Harold J.L., Hon. Secretary’s Report. “Nothing further has been undertaken as regards dialect recording…this is the most important work which the Y.D.S. has in hand.” 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 9-10.

Bruff, H(arold) J.L., An Old Yorkshire Chimney Sweep. Words collected 1905 from an 80-year-old sweep, a Mr Tipling, of Knaresborough, suggest derivatives from Romany, Cant, Rhyming Slang, Back Slang and possibly Shelta. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 21-23.

Bruff, Harold J.L., Hon. Secretary’s Report. “[At] the General Annual Meeting …the Paper to be read … was by … William Wood…“The Dialect of the Hambleton Hills” (Wartime economies meant that this was not published in Transactions 1942, but specimens from the appendix were included – see HAMBLETON HILLS.) 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 6-7.

BRUFF, HAROLD – (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 6.

BUBWITH, DIALECT OF. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 29-34.

CAEDMON– see Wood, William.

CAM HOUSES, WHARFEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

CANT, VAGRANTS’ CANT. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

Carter, F.A., A Survey of West Riding Dialect Drama. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 10-19.

CASTILLO, JOHN, dialect poet. 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 7.

CAULD LAD OF HILTON. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 10-11.

Cawley, A.C., A Modernised Version of the Wakefield Second Shepherds’ Play. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 8-28.

CHIMNEY SWEEP’S LANGUAGE: see Bruff, H.J.L., An Old Yorkshire Chimney Sweep.

Clayton, Edward P., The Dialect of Pinchinthorpe in the North Riding. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 35-41.

CLEVELAND, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

CONTENTS OF VOLUMES: Brief listings of contents appear in all issues, up to the previous issue. The latest and fullest list for this decade is therefore: 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 76-80.

COOK, DAVIDSON, scholar of Scots language – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

Copland, Captain B.D., Reflections of a Newcomer. “Possibly the most important lesson learned by the field worker in Africa is that the language is an integral part of the culture of the people concerned.” Editorial note added: “Our investigators invariably use the International phonetic Alphabet.” 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 44-47.

Cowley, W., Moorland Harvest. Poem in dialect. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 57.

COWLING, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

DENTDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

DIALECT, USE OF IN DALES, and bi-lingualism with Standard English. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

DICKINS, Professor (BRUCE) – see Wood, William

Dickins, Bruce, Yorkshire Hobs. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 9-23. “Hob” is seen to be the equivalent of nisse (Danish), tomte (Swedish), kaboutermannje (Dutch), a supernatural housecleaning fairy.

DISGUISED IRISH. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

Dowson, F.W. Watther Ark (A Legend of the Foss). Ballad in dialect. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 32-33.
Deep i’ yon peeal did Johnnie lig,
Which neean as yit could faddom;
With grief ower her poor laddie’s tomb,
The lassie deed at t’ boddom.

Doyle-Davidson, W.A.G. jointly with Orton, Harold, Editorial. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 5-6.

DRIFFIELD, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

DUERLEY VALLEY, GAYLE, HAWES. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 19.

Dyson, B.R., Book Review, of: The White Rose Garland: An Anthology of Yorkshire Dialect Verse, edited by Wilfred S.Halliday & Arthur Stanley Umpleby. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 41-44.

EAST WITTON. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

FLEET MOSS PASS. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 15.

GEORDIE, TOWN HEAD, REETH, DIALECT OF. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 20-21.

GERVASE OF TILBURY. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 9.

GIRALDUS CAMBRENSIS. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 9-10.

GNOMIC VERSES, OLD ENGLISH COTTONIAN. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

GOATHLAND, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

GOTHIC GRAMMAR – see: Sheard, J.A.

Goundrill, G.J., Spring on t’Farm. Prose piece in dialect. “Wa could see York Minster thotty mahle to t’sooth”. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 42-44.

GRENDEL, as “þyrs”. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

GUNNERSIDE, SWALEDALE. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 20.

HACKNESS DIALECT – see Wood, William.

HALIFAX – see: Sheard, J.A.

Halliday, Winifred, Book Review, of: What Do they Know of Yorkshire by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (Eyre and Spottiswoode). “The author takes us to remote and lovely corners of the globe where Yorkshire folk … recreate … the corner of England that gave them birth… Dialect poetry is sometimes artificial, banal and harsh. D(orothy) U(na) R(atcliffe)’s is fresh and natural…” (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 22

Halliday, W.J., Editorial. “The work of such a Society as ours can be no more than a relief and relaxation from the serious efforts of winning the war… It was decided to issue the Transactions as long as this was practicable.” Lists Yorkshire dialect publications available at that time:
A Little Book of Yorkshire Dialect
Blackah, Thomas, Dialect Poems and Prose
Bruff, H.J.L., T’ Miners
Carter F.A. & Taylor, George, dialect comedies
Cowling, Professor G.H., a scientific study of the dialect of Hackness, c. 1916.
Cowling, Professor G.H., A Yorkshire Reciter
Hyde, Mr., East Riding dialect comedies
Moorman, Professor, Anthology of Yorkshire Dialect Poems
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Dale Courtin’
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Dale Lyrics
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Fairings
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Lillilows
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Singing Rivers
Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Shoeing of Jerry-g-nimble
Back numbers of Y.D.S. Transactions
Stanley Umpleby, A Boddin o’ Cowls
York Minster Screen, originally published at Malton in 1833
Yorkshire book(s) of J. Fairfax-Blakeborough
Yorkshire book(s) of A.J.Brown
Yorkshire book(s) of Marie Hartley
Yorkshire book(s) of Ella Pontefract
(Also advertised in the same issue are: A Yorkshire Dialogue (1683); Hazelthwaite Hall “a straightforward play” by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe).
1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 5-8.

Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. Joseph Wright’s English Dialect Dictionary was the germ of the Society, which formed in 1897 – 288 members listed in the first Transactions – original programme “bewildering in its complexity and scope” e.g. Copy out all place-names in the Parish Register – Has the society “completed its task”? – Gramophone records made of dialects of Baildon, Driffield, Cowling, Cleveland, Sheffield and Goathland – Glossaries to be made of terms used in the staple industries of the county. “The field for research and study in the dialect is limitless”. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28. H(alliday), W.J., Book Review, of: Mrs Buffey in Wartime, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. “The humour and tragedy of our strained way of life for the last four years are mirrored in the homely wisdom…of Mrs. Buffey.” 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 50.

Halliday, W.J., Editorial. “The main feature of the past year was the publication of Yorkshire Dialect Poems 1914-1943 by Members of the Yorkshire Dialect Society”. 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} pp 5-6.

Halliday, W.J., Editorial. “We ought to aim at an annual publication that is popular in appeal…at the easy price of 1 (shilling)… Death of…Mr Harald (Harold?) Bruff…(who) published a work dealing with the dialect of the (lead) miners (at Greenhow).” (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 5-7.

Halliday, W.J., Foreword, by the Editor. “Next year will be the jubilee our Society…founded…September 21st, 1897.” (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 5-7.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review, of: John Thwaite’s Wensleydale Dialect Rhymes, with a dialect glossary by A. Stanley Umpleby. (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 25-26.

(Halliday, W.J. – presumed Editor), Many Happy Returns. Congratulations on 50 years of the Society from: Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (4 lines of dialect verse), Archbishop of York, Sir William Craigie, Arthur Greenwood M.P., Dr. J. D. Jones (memories of the Society), J.B.Priestley, and Mrs Elizabeth M. Wright (widow of Joseph Wright). (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} pp 5-8.

Halliday, W.J., The Yorkshire Dialect Society (1897-1947): Fifty Years of Dialect Progress. A very full history. (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} pp 12-26.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review, of: The Daystar: A Nativity Play by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. “Not in dialect” but of “winsome simplicity”. (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 44.

HAMBLETON HILLS, DIALECT OF.
1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 7.
1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 24-43.
(1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 10-23.

HAND-KNITTING IN THE DALES. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

HARRIS, J(OEL) C(HANDLER) (author of Uncle Remus stories). “The dialect of (Chandler’s) Daddy Jack from the rice-growing district of Georgia bears a remarkable resemblance to the speech of the negroes in Dutch Guiana [Surinam] – ‘Da lot kisi hem, vo a go meki switi smooko na ini da temple vo Masra’ (St. Luke chapter 1. 9 in Negro English (sic) / Sranan Tongo of Surinam). 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 20.

HART HALL, GLAISDALE – quoting a page-worth of narrative in dialect. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 20-21.

HAWES in WENSLEYDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

Hedger, Ruth, London Piece. Poem in dialect.
Wi’ poodther an’ paint she clarts ’er phiz,
An’ she talks lahke fawks on t’ Wiyerless diz.
(1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 42.

HOB GARTH, GLAISDALE. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 20.

HOBS, HOBTHRUS (HOBGOBLINS, HOUSE-ELVES). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 9-23. In various counties: pp14-22.

HOLDERNESS, WORDS USED IN. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 16.

HOME, GORDON (The Evolution of a Yorkshire Town – concerning Pickering). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 18-19.

Horspool, Robert, Lullaby. Poem in dialect. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} page 37.

Horspool, Robert, Triolets. Two short poems in dialect in this strict metrical form. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 58.

HUDDERSFIELD DIALECT – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

HYDE, F. AUSTIN (Home Cured, play in Yorkshire dialect). 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 75.

ISOGLOSSES – see: Rohrer, Fritz

Jones, W.E., A Note on the Pronunciation of the Definite Article in Yorkshire Dialect. “The definite article is affected…by the sounds that surround it…[or made by] a complete stoppage of breath and voice for a very short time.” 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 35-36.

Kelk, Arthur, Harvest Moon. Poem in dialect. (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} page 24.

Langrick, Annie E., The Dialect of Bubwith in the East Riding of Yorkshire. “profusion of Old Norse borrowings … low-lying meadows near the river Derwent … are called the [ıŋzız] Ings, … from Norse engr.” (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 29-34.

Langrick, Annie E., The Farm-Cart. Drawing of cart with named parts, page 32. Much vocabulary with IPA (phonetic) renderings. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 31-34.

Lawson, Mabel S., The Dialect of Staithes in the North Riding of Yorkshire. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp. 24-28.

LILT, IN DALES SPEECH. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 19.

LISTS OF MEMBERS:
1. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 38-45.
2. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 54-62.
3. 1943. pp 27-37.
4. (1944, published 1945). pp 44-56.
5. (1945, published 1946). pp 29-41.
6. (1946, published 1947). pp 46-58.
7. (1947, published 1948). pp 47-59.
8. 1949. pp 46-59.
9. 1950. pp 62-75.

MARSETT. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

MASTER RYPON OF DURHAM. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 10-11. page 13.

MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN PRIMER – see: Sheard, J.A.

MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM (Shakespeare). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 9.

MILTON, JOHN. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 9.

MINKLER’S THARI (SHELTA). passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

MINERS’ JARGON. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

MINOT, LAURENCE – see Wood, William

Moody, F.W., Book Review, of: Until that Dawn, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 40-41.

Moody, F.W., Oatbread. Generalised illustration page 20, diagram of bakestones page 26. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} pp 20-30.

Moody, F.W., Some Textile Terms from Addingham in the West Riding. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 37-43.

NEEDI-MIZZLER (hereditary vagrant), LANGUAGE OF. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

Nicholas, Q., The Dormouse. Poem in dialect. (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 40.

NIDDERDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

NIPSY (a game played in South Yorkshire) – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

NORTH RIDING PLACE-NAMES – see Wood, William

NORTH RIDING QUARTER SESSIONS – see Wood, William

Orton, Harold, Dialectal English and the Student. Advocates producing a Linguistic Atlas for England (only?) on the U.S. model. (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} pp 27-38.

Orton, Harold, jointly with Doyle-Davidson, W.A.G., Editorial. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp 5-6.

OUGHTRED family, of Hob Hill, Upleatham. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 19-20.

OVER SILTON “HOBTHRUSH” (= hobgoblin). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 21.

Phillips, Mrs. McGrigor – otherwise known as: Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, q.v.

PICKERING – see HOME, GORDON.

PICKERING DIALECT – see Wood, William

Pobjoy, Marion, Parson’s Loin, Emla’. Poem in dialect. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 59.

Pontefract, Ella, Dales Life and Character. Dialogue in dialect. Sketch of the Green at Town Head, Reeth in Swaledale, page 12. “ ‘Ah nivver count ma sheep. Ah ken ivvery yan i’ t’ flock ,’ from a Swaledale farmer.” (Names of locations indexed herein). (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

PRIVATE LANGUAGES. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

PUBLICATIONS OF/ABOUT YORKSHIRE DIALECT – see Halliday, W.J., Editorial. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 5-8.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Coom thi Ways In! (President’s Message). “If the Germans destroyed every historic building in this country, we should still retain the records of hundreds of years enshrined in some of the words of our language … Dialect is a simpler and earlier form of our language, one that is not subject to changes either of stress, intonation or fashion” (Is this true? – Compiler) (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 6-7

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Farmeress to her Son on Active Duty. Dialect Poem in the form of a letter.
We’ve been gi’en bran new cleugh-gates (gates of a mill-race) an’ our varra ancient mill
Has ben what’s called ‘reconditioned’ and is turnin’ wiv a will.
(1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 23-24

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Isaiah Boswell (A Yorkshire Gypsy on the outskirts of Chicago). Poem in dialect, with Romany words included. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} page 30.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Summer’s Coom. Poem in dialect. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 48.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Fra’ t’ Middle East. Poem in dialect. …a high road
Twistin’ an’ turnin’ through meadow an’ plough an’ intake.
1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 48.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Wensleydale Lullaby. Poem in dialect. (Doy = darling). 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 23.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una. Umpleby, T’ Croodle Beck. Poem in dialect.
I recollect a dozen Springs
’At crowd this last yan oot,
When Time itsen had gowden wings
An’ Life held niver a doobt.
(1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 41.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’ Lass o’ Dallowgill. Poem in dialect.
After wark’s done at cockshut
I lean on t’ yat…
(1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 39.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Nan Dowding. Poem in dialect.
Doucely he came to our door
An’ doucely lifted t’ sneck.
(1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 40.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, It’s grand to Coom Hame. Poem in dialect. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} page 45.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Jeremy-Joy (The Missel Thrush). Poem in dialect, concerning the woodland bird Turdus viscivorus. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} page 45.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Moondial. Poem in dialect. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} page 38.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, T’Moors. Poem in dialect. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 55.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Hill-Shepherd’s Wife. Poem, in dialect with 4 words glossed. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 56.

REETH IN SWALEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. Sketch on page 12 (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21

RIEVAULX ABBEY MASS BOOK – see Wood, William

ROBERT OF KNARESBOROUGH, SAINT, LIFE OF. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 13.

ROBIN GOOD-FELLOW. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 11- 12.

Rohrer, Fritz (Zürich), The Border between the Northern and North-Midland Dialects in Yorkshire. 4 maps with isoglosses and dialect border indications. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 29-37.

ROMANY. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

RUNSWICK BAY (its hobgoblin). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 21-22.

RUSHWORTH GOSPELS – see: Sheard, J.A.

RYPON OF DURHAM, “MASTER”. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 10-11. page 13.

SADDLEWORTH. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 17-18.

SCOT, REGINALD, DISCOVERIE OF WITCHCRAFT. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 11.

SCOTS LANGUAGE – see: Bayford, E.G.

ST. JULIANA (Middle English text). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

ST. KATHERINE (Middle English text). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

SEINTE MARHERETE (Middle English text). 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 12.

Sheard, J.A., Some Recent Research in West Riding Dialects. “The (Old English) Rushworth (Gospels) gloss…belongs to this area…doubtful if it reflects any of the idiom of the area.” Article suggests phonetic variants according to a predictable and regular system in the manner of Joseph Wright’s Gothic Grammar and Middle High German Primer, as well as “rules” worked out by John Watson (History and Antiquities of the Parish of Halifax) 1775. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 15-38.

SHEEP, PREOCCUPATION WITH. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

SHEFFIELD, DIALECT OF. Gramophone record made by Y.D.S. – see Halliday, W.J., Yorkshire Dialect Society: History and Aims. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 24-28.

SHELDRU. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

SHELTA. passim in Speech Survival, 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} pp 14-20.

SRANAN TONGO (Surinam Creole English) – see HARRIS, J.C.

STAITHES, DIALECT OF. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} pp. 24-28.

STAITHES, CRAB & LOBSTER FISHING – see Tindall, Mabel S.

STURFIT HALL, REETH. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 10- 11. page 20.

SURTEES SOCIETY – see Wood, William

SWALEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

SWARDILS (sheep breed). (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} page 15.

THWAITE, JOHN, dialect poet, died 1941. (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 25-26.

Tindall, Mabel S., Crab and Lobster Fishing at Staithes in the North Riding. Diagram of three-bowed crab pot, page 45; Vocabulary of the Staithes crab-pot, page 50. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 44 -50.

TREDDLEHOYLE, TOM – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

TURNER, SIR BEN. 1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 7.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, Goosepool. Poem in dialect, with glossary beneath. 1941 {Part XLII. Volume VI} page 31.

Umpleby, Stanley, Anxious Days. Poem in dialect, with some explanations:
Arg’ an’ them – Isaac and his crew
ivv’ry like – every now and then
wyke – bay (Staithes Wyke)
1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} page 49.

Umpleby, Stanley, The Secretary and Treasurer’s Report. “…Professor Dickins, at short notice, read a paper on John Castillo.” 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} pp 7-11.

Umpleby, Stanley, Reeaks (Rooks – the bird Corvus frugilegus). Poem in dialect, with explanations. 1943 {Part XLIV. Volume VII, published June 1944} page 24.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, Annual Report. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 8-9.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, Wood End. Poem in dialect.
Yon’s gran’dad scaalin’
T’ few hens the’r coorn.
(1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 39.

Umpleby, A. Stanley, Mary. Poem in dialect, with explanations.
Mary’s si tall an’ prood
At iv onny croowd
She’s kenspeckle (easily recognised)…
(1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 40.

UMPLEBY, A. STANLEY. (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 25-26.

Umpleby, Stanley, Sammin ’em up. Poem in dialect, concerning the conversion into a shop of the chapel of the “Ranters”. (“Ranters” apparently refers to the denomination called the Primitive Methodists, founded Mow Cop, Cheshire/Staffordshire in the early 19th century by Hugh Bourne of Biddulph, and William Clowes, characterised by “noisy preaching” and largely workingclass membership, united with the Methodist Church in the 1930s – Compiler.) (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 41.

Umpleby, Stanley, T’ Jubilee. Poem in dialect. (1946) {Vol. VII. Part XLVII, published 1947} page 43.

Umpleby, Stanley, The Staithes Fisherlad and a New Poster. Stanza in dialect. (1947) {Part XLVIII. Volume VIII, published 1948} page 28.

Umpleby, Stanley, The Belaboured Labrador, or, Ower Monny Bosses. Poem in dialect. 1949 {Part XLIX. Volume VIII} page 39.

Umpleby, Stanley, Ballade of a Mixed Reception, or, Tea-Time o’ Threshin’-Day. Poem in dialect in this strict metrical form, with 14 words glossed. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} page 60.

Wade, Gwen, T’ Lass thra Buckden. Poem in dialect 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 51-52.

Wade, Gwen, Death and Annie Maria. Prose story in dialect. 1950 {Part L. Volume VIII} pp 52-54.

WADSLEY JACK (Sheffield) – see item by E.G. Bayford. (1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} pp 10-14.

WENSLEYDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

WENSLEYDALE DIALECT RHYMES. 1946 {Volume VII. Part XLVI} pp 25-26.

WHARFEDALE. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

“W.H.” (possibly W.J.Halliday or Winifred Halliday?), Book Review, of: Dorothy Una Ratcliffe’s Delightsome Land, published by Eyre & Spottiswood.
“The lilting language of the northern dales…the author’s lyrical prose…Fred Lawson’s illustrations convey the same lyrical nostalgic atmosphere.”
(1944) {Vol. VII. Part XLV, published 1945} page 42.

WITTON, EAST. passim in Dales Life and Character. (1940) {Part XLI. Volume VI, published April 1941} pp 12-21.

(Wood, William,) Specimens of the Hambleton Dialect. Phonetic Symbols (These are used throughout this account: a very useful procedure – Compiler) pp 24-25.
· A Conversation in the Modern Dialect (phonetic transcription and orthography version on opposite pages) pp 26-33. “- ’Oo far ’e yer been this efterneean? – Four or five mile. Ah follered t’moor wall along ti Steeple Cross an’ then walked along t’top till Ah got to t’road near t’quarry. – Didta see onnybody on yer travils? – Nobody at all.”
· Some Verses in the Modern Dialect – Seterda Neet (phonetic transcription and orthography version on opposite pages) pp 34-41.
An’ takkin’ t’gaffer’s coo or sow
Ah genly gans ti Osi [Osmotherley] show.
· A Short Story in the Modern Dialect (modified from a story in Rev. M.C.F.Morris, Yorkshire Folk-Talk, 1892.)
(phonetic transcription and orthography version on opposite pages) pp 42-43. “Ah seed a greeat lang swanky chap sat i’ t’ lang settle ower ageean us.”
1942 {Part XLIII. Volume VII} pp 24-43.

Wood, William, An Investigation of the Hambleton Dialect. Given the hint by Professor Bruce Dickins, Wood began to note words and phrases whilst helping with the harvest, then investigated derivations from Old English, Norse, &c., though “Some words…have no known parentage.” Investigation of historical “North Riding” dialect included: (a) Caedmon’s Poem; (b) Laurence Minot; (c) The Lay Folk’s Mass Book (Rievaulx Abbey); (d) Surtees Society publication of wills; (e) Proceedings of Quarter sessions 17th century, printed by North Riding Records Society; (f) A Yorkshire Dialogue 1673; (g) A Yorkshire Dialogue 1683; (h) The Rural Economy of Yorkshire (notes on Pickering dialect) c. 1786; (i) York Minster Screen; (j) G.H.Cowling’s book on Hackness dialect; (k) A.H.Smith, Placenames of the North Riding of Yorkshire. Traces development of Middle English, etc. sound system. Dialect dialogue, pp 18-19. Discusses changes in dialect, and survival. [Also see Specimens, above, in 1942 issue.] (1945) {Vol. VII. Part XLVI, published 1946} pp 10-23.

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