0 items - £0.00 0
  • No products in the cart.

An Index of the Contents of the Transactions for the Years 1921-1930

Before they were famous! In the 1920s we have J.R.R.Tolkien addressing the Society – not the only Brummy (person from Birmingham) to take an interest in Yorkshire Dialect. We are still, too, in the early days of the Society, and several solid areas of interest are covered with major articles – such as E.V.Gordon’s detailed piece on the Scandinavian element, and the mining terms at Greenhow Hill – not to mention such antiquities as the Beverley Plays and various Middle English texts that illustrate the development and regionality of the English language. Indeed, it is difficult to separate these investigations from the work on Early English in general that tended to pre-occupy this period and the decades before. This is also the place to look for stray references to dialects a long way outside Yorkshire – from Banff to Cornwall.

The indexing technique reflects the distance in time between these Transactions and the present day: the Compiler has endeavoured to enable enquirers to follow the trail that leads to publications and personalities that may not be traceable elsewhere: we also need to grasp the nature and scope of the pieces written in dialect at that time, some of which reflect lifetimes extending a long way back into the 19th century. For this reason, there is much quoting. There is also an attempt to summarise some of the longer articles.

Readers will also note that the Compiler has not been shy here of drawing their attention to places where he feels the conclusions or statements of the writers need to be revisited. If some of these important items were ever reprinted, additional remarks might improve their value for language scholarship. For instance, the remarks on Nordic influences in Yorkshire – made so much of for good reason over the decades – often stand strangely isolated from the researches and regional dimensions dealt with so adequately in Danish and Swedish publications. It would be a pity if the profound and abundant discussions engaged in by these Nordic authors should be ignored by those with a serious curiosity about the historical and linguistic links with the three “Thirdings”.

All human life is here! As in other decades, we are often surprised by the variety of human experience expressed through the study of dialect: it can be particularly strong in articulating working-class culture and often vanished trades and occupations. We hope that these indexes may also be of help to those with an interest in such matters as these.

Allison, L.H., Secretary’s Report. 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} page 3.

Allison, Miss L.H., Secretary’s Report. “An extra ‘Special’ Meeting was held .., to take advantage of Dr. Eilert Ekwall’s presence in England.” 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 4-5.

Allison, L.H., Secretary’s Report. “Need for … a standard spelling, that Yorkshiremen might be able to read their dialect as Scotsmen did theirs.” 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 5-7.

Askew, H., contributed by, Three Folk Plays:
1. Sword Dancers’ Play (c. 1799, not in dialect);
2. Durham Version of the Guiser’s Play (not in dialect);
3. Border Version of the Guiser’s Play (not in dialect – a reference to Quebec suggests a date).
1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 29-35.

BANFFSHIRE DIALECT – see BUCHAN DIALECT.

Bayford, E.G., Bairnsla’s Best, wi’ a Bit abaught t’Others. Some writers and literature cited in this Paper:
Bairnsla Foaks’ Annual;
Ben Bunt’s Weddin;
Bobbinwinder, Sally (Barnsley);
Booth, E.C., dialect novel, Fondie;
Bywater, Abel, the “Shevvild Chap”;
Clegg, John Trafford, Lancashire dialect writer;
Conversation between Peter Pickingpeg, &c.;
Craven version of the Song of Solomon;
Hanby, George;
Hartley, John, Yorkshire Dialect poet;
Littledale, H.A.;
Nan Bunt’s Chresmas Tea-party;
Pledge, Peter (= George Hanby);
Pogmoor Olmenack, The, 1873;
Pogmoor Version of Song of Solomon (at request of Prince Louis Lucien Bonaparte);
Rogers, Charles, “Bairnsla’s Best”;
Scratcherd, Norrison (Morley);
Shevvild version of the Song of Solomon;
Treddlehoyle, Tom, Barnsley (1838 on);
Waugh, Edwin, Lancashire dialect writer.
“Who desires to study seriously our Yorkshire dialects must devote considerable attention to Bairnsla’s Best and gie a gooid bit to t’others.” 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 31-40.

BEVERLEY PLAYS. 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 18-42. – also see under Witty, J.R.

BEVERLEY RHYMING CHARTER – see Witty, J.R. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 36-44.

Binnall, Geraldine, Oor Awd Spot. Poem in dialect.
’Tis t’bonniest plaace as ivver was,
Is oor awd spot.
1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} page 30.

Binnall, Geraldine, Ah, Mun! Poem in dialect.
So Ah offs t’ doctor’s o’ Satherday
Ti t’ new chap yonder oot Bubblesby way…
1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} page 31.

Blakeborough, “the late” R., Au’d Nan o’ Sexhow. A narrative poem in Cleveland dialect:
He war stiddy, hard-warking, wiv oft a wet sark,
Wi’ toilin’ an’ moilin’, wiv a nivver gi’e ower;
He wrought leyke a hoss fra cock-craw whahl dark.
Includes glossary. 1923 {Part XXIV Volume IV} pp 55-67.

Blakeston, Henrietta, Music on t’ Wawds. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
It soonds on t’ flutterin’ swaal o’ t’ leaves, in t’ rustlin’ swish o’ t’corn,
It soonds in t’ crawin’ uv all t’cocks i’ t’ staggarth ivery morn.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 16-17.

Bruff, H.J.L., A Glossary of Mining Terms in Common Use among the Miners of Greenhow Hill in Yorkshire. A very fulsome list, with remarks on work customs:
It war nowt bud oade man, dowk an’ deeads. – It was nothing but the debris left by a previous miner (“oade man”), sand and clay that will run when wet (“dowk”) and previously blasted out stones containing no useful lead veins (“deads”). 1923 {Part XXIV Volume IV} pp 23- 54.

Bruff, Harald, Some Further Mining Terms from Greenhow. “Welt. to overthrow, roll a stone along with crow-bars by overturning it. O(ld) N(orse) velta.” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 40-42.

Bruff, Harald J.L., Yorkshire Dialects. Proposed Gramophonic Recording. 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 26-30.

BUCHAN DIALECT. 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} page 47; 1924 {Part XXV. Volume IV} pp 29-30.

CALDERDALE FOLK-LORE & DIALECT. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

Carter, F.A., Assault and Battery. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
Well! o’s a’ to belike to pay
But it weean’t be wi’ a thoil (willingly)
Thirty shillin’ and costs,
Or fourteen days i’ t’ oil.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} page 20.

Charlesworth, Douglas, The Herdsman’s Christmas. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
Through t’mistal door t’war cooming…
Voices e’-sweetly singing…
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 13-14.

Charlesworth, Douglas, The Sower. Poem in dialect.
Kings may hev reigned an conquered far,
Lords be oppressing t’ poor,
But t’ king an lord for far an nar
Is sowing upo t’ moor.
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 41.

Contents of Transactions: Back lists are given in each issue: even in 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} the editors inform us that Parts I-IV are “Out of Print”; most lists, therefore, begin with Part V.

CORNISH (English) DIALECT. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 11-12.

Cowling, G.H., The Felon Sewe of Rokeby. Ballad text of the fetching of a huge wild sow referred to in Sir Walter Scott’s long poem Rokeby. “If the poem is an 18th century forgery, revamped by Scott, the author was by far the cunningest imitator in style and diction amongst those who constructed ballads. Compared with Thomas Percy’s handiwork, it bears the stamp of genuineness.” 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 32-35.

C(owling?) G.H., Book Review of: Tales of the Ridings, by F.W.Moorman. Dialect can be given as the dialogue in otherwise “dignified and polished literary English”, or set as the words of a narrator after an introduction in standard English. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 47-50.

C(owling?) G.H., Book Review of: T’Ill, an’ T’Oade Uns upuv Greenho’, by Harold (sic) Bruff. Uncanny ghost stories connected with lead-mining Greenhow area. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 50-51.

Cowling, G.H. & Halliday, W.J., editors, Report for 1921. “A Little Book of Yorkshire Dialect is already in the hands of members, and it is hoped to publish a second edition…January 20th, 1922, a lecture of ‘The New English Dictionary’ was given by Mr. J.R.R. Tolkien, Reader in English Language in the University of Leeds.” 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} page 5.

Cowling, G.H. Book Review of: The Roxburghshire Word-Book, by George Watson (Cambridge University Press) an account of the Scottish dialect in that county: fewer Gaelic words, some Northern English words, some from Romany, “steadily growing dialect literature.” 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 27-28.

Cowling, G.H,, The Mummer’s Play. Discusses the origin and age of the Pace Egg folk play, referring to The Mummers’ Play, by R.J.E.Tiddy (Oxford University Press). “Can we seriously believe that this mummery which was acted all over England is a survival from pagan times? From what paganism did it survive? … if it dates from the Middle Ages, [it] was done for the sake of merry England and not as white magic.” 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 30-33.

CUMBERLAND DIALECT LITERATURE. 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 20- 40.

CUMBRIAN – see CUMBERLAND.

Declinatio Significationis Verborum. A graph (sic) showing divergence of meanings for “girdle, girder,” etc. from the Aryan (sic) root GHAR. Loose in 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} Transactions.

DELONEY, THOMAS. 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 41-44.

Denby, M., Decay and Death in English Vocabulary. “What is happening at present has happened in previous generations. Words which were standard … will not be tolerated in succeeding generations …” But some survive in combinations: e.g. “garlick” from gar (spear) + leek (the spear-shaped leek). “… A curious and interesting last stronghold of words, viz. dialect.” 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 6-17.

Dowson, Frank W., Notes on the Goathland Folk Play. “Mr. Grayson is now aged 78, and saw the dance at Beckhole more than 70 years ago.” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 36-38.

editors, Book Review of a “dainty brochure”, Knaresborough: A Poem in the Yorkshire Dialect, by J. Sutcliffe Smith. 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} page 47.

editors, Book Review of: Swatches o’ Homespun (“The New Blyth Horticultural Society”) Prose sketches and verses in the dialect of Buchan. 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} page 47.

editors, Dialect Competition 1923. Winning entries printed (indexed separately here) 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 13-20.

editors, Book Review of: T’Miners: Character Sketches of Yorkshire Lead Miners, by Harald J.L. Bruff (published by T.A.J. Waddington, York). “The characters themselves usually speak in their native Doric.” 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 45-46.

editors, Book Reviews of: An Elementary Old English Grammar, by Professor Joseph Wright, and: An Elementary Middle English Grammar, by Professor Joseph Wright. “The making of a Middle English grammar is a stupendous task, before which all but the stoutest hearts have hitherto quailed.” 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 46-47.

editors, Yorkshire Dialect Competition. “The succesful pieces appeared in The Yorkshire Weekly Post.” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} page 39.

editors, Book Reviews of: 1. The Shoeing of Jerry-Go-Nimble, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe, 2. Dale Lyrics, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (both published by John Lane). 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 50-51.

editors, Book Review of: A Yorkshire Dialect Reciter, by George H. Cowling (Folk Press Ltd) “Should be in the pocket of every dialect lover.” 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} page 52.

editors, Yorkshiremen and Scotsmen. Similarities in Dialect. Summary of talk given by William Grant, of Aberdeen, asking assistance of Yorkshire people in the compilation of the new Scottish Dictionary, and of the discussion which ensued. 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 24-25.

editors, Book Review of: Wireless and Sick-Like, by F. Austin Hyde (Swan Press), and The Prodigal Husband, by Claudia L. Wood (Swan Press).
“Two single-act comedies … lively … funny, and full of … downright mense.” 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} page 37.

editors, Book Review of: Quaaint Owd Knaresborough and Other Poems, by C.W.Eastwood (Folk Press Ltd). “The dialect is well managed”. 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} page 38.

editors, Book Review of: The Legend of the Wharfe, by J.A. Carlill (published by Arthur Stockwell Ltd.). Folklore rather than dialect. 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} page 38.

EKWALL, EILERT [compiler of: Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names]. 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} page 4.

Elgee, Frank, An Inheritor of the Earth. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition:
Ah knaws ’at all these soonds and seets,
An’ monny mair besides,
Are mahn – an’ t’ silent starry neets,
An’ t’ heeam leets on t’ hill sides.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} page 19.

Fairfax-Blakeborough, J., A Yorkshire Dialect Survey. “The definite article should always be written t apostrophe… The aspirate [h] is almost unknown … I have always considered T’ Hunt o’ Yatton Brig by my late father as being one of the classics in the Yorkshire dialect.” 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 9-23.

Fairfax-Blakeborough, J., The Impressiveness of Dialect. Objects to dialect speech on a platform always being regarded as humorous: useful for pathos and deeper thought as well. Dialect words (Osmotherley) to psalm-settings at a time of cattle plague 1745-1747:
An’ we shall have no coos at all,
We doot, within the land.
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 33-37.

Farnell, A., Owd Things are Best. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
Aw like t’ owd twang;
Brooad Yorksher speyks soa plain an’ streyt.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 14-15.

G.H.C. – see C(owling?), G.H.

Gordon, E.V., Scandinavian Influence in Yorkshire Dialects. Valuable essay on the history of Norse settlement: list of Kings of York. Danish vs. Norwegian elements (Gordon’s Norse dialectology can be interpreted as rather too cut-and-dried: compare his sharp contrast between West Norse and East Norse – as in his Introduction to Old Norse – with e.g. Ola J. Holten, Fastgrodd Artikkel / Stivna Dativformer, Ein Morfemstudie, Trondheim 1976 – Compiler). Posits a period when Norse and English were spoken side by side in Yorkshire, without much blending – “blending … accomplished mainly during the 12th century”. The loanwords (“they/them”, “at” for “that”, etc.) indicate “a very intimate blending” (whatever that means). (Much made of the “Celtic” influence in inversion genitives in place-names, though that idiom seems to be quite at home in Icelandic – Compiler). Phrases in 14th century English alliterative poetry – the more and the mynne (the more and the less), garsome and gold (treasure and gold) – show Scandinavian parallels. (Compiler – Perhaps de-emphasised are the closeness of Anglian English to Danish before the Viking invasions, and the uncanny closeness to English – as in H.C.Andersen – of certain Danish idioms.) 1923 {Part XXIV Volume IV} pp 5-22.

Gordon, E.V. & Smith A.H., The River Names of Yorkshire. (The “Celtic” element should perhaps be rephrased “British” or “Early Welsh” – Compiler) “Near Cricieth … the Dwy for and the Dwy fach … Dwy must (sic) be descended from British Deiva, ‘goddess’… Derwent from derva (sic – why not derwen?) ‘oak tree’….m appears unmutated in Elmet (=Welsh Elfed).” (Often grasping at linguistic straws rather than trying to suggest why a particular river is so named. However, Tame is supposed to mean ‘?dark’ and the reportedly cognate Taff does exhibit a darker colour at its junction with the Rhondda at Pontypridd, South Wales – Compiler). List of sources. Index to article. 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 5-30.

GREENHOW MINING VOCABULARY – see Bruff, H(arald) J.L.

Haigh, W.E., A New Glossary of the Dialect of the Huddersfield District.
- Wiɜr dun yo kum thrɜ?
- Wi kumn thrɜ ‘Smithy Place’
- Yo’n wokt æpn?
- Nē, wi’n kumn i’ t’bus.
“I have adopted a phonetic scheme of spelling based on that in Wright’s Windhill Grammar.” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 20-28.

Haigh, W.E., A Glossary of the Huddersfield Dialect. A response to the strictures given in the book review by George Taylor in 1928. 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 27-30.

HALIFAX DIALECT SOURCES – see Marsden, F.H., Two Essays on the Dialect of Upper Calderdale. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

Halliday, Wilfred J., The Yorkshire Dialect Society’s Competition, 1920. “a great success”. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 45-46.

Halliday, W.J. – see Cowling, G.H. & Halliday, W.J., editors, Report for 1921, in Transactions for 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV}, page 5.

Halliday, W.J., Dialect Progress: A Short Review. “Through the columns of the Yorkshire press there has been … a constant flow of songs, sketches and stories in the Yorkshire Dialect … When in the fulness of time the new Burns shall arise to crown their halting and fugitive endeavours, faith and fervour will have won their due reward.” 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 43-46.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: The Merry Shire. Poems in the Yorkshire dialect by Albert Hugh Smith (Swan Press, Leeds). “The assiduous collector of curious words rather than [a] poet.” 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 28-29.

Halliday, W.J., Book Review of: Swatches o’ Hamespun (Third Series: Banffshire Journal Ltd., Banff, 1923). “Fat’s the eese in a’ the warld o’ writin doon dirt like that?” – but this attitude to writing dialect is refuted. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 29-30.

Halliday, W.J., A Glimpse of the West Riding Dialect of Shakespeare’s Day. Among the “realistic” novels of Thomas Deloney (born Norwich) The Pleasant History of Thomas of Reading contains Halifax, etc. dialect dialogue: “Yea gude faith, mai Liedge, the faule eule of mai saule, giff any thing will keep them whiat, till the karles be hanged by the cragge.” 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 41-44.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Yorkshire, by F.R.Pearson (Borzoi County Histories, published by Alfred A. Knopf Ltd). 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 31-32.

H(alliday), W.J., Book Review of: Fairings: A Yorkshire Miscellany, by Dorothy Una Ratcliffe (published by The Bodley Head). Prose pieces, one-act plays (with “racy dialogue”) and poems, “vignettes of dale character”. 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 32.

Halliday, W.J., Spring. Poem in dialect.
It’s guid ta be ahtside i’ t’ sunshine
Wi’ t’ trees just beginning ta bud.
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 42.

Halliday, W.J., The Year’s Work. Text to be used in producing gramophone records of dialect speech (“Great attention was paid to the proper distribution of vowel sounds”); death of Joseph Wright reported. 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 8-13.

Hardwicke, G., Yorkshire Dialect. “[This kind of speech] falls from the lips of the people of the wolds and moors in the neighbourhood of Pickering … now chiefly used by people engaged in agriculture … gate post; “Broad Yorkshire”: geeat posst; “Northern Dialect”: yat stoup … oak beam; “Broad Yorkshire”: ooak beam; “Northern Dialect”: yak booak. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 5-7.

Hardwicke, G., King Alfred and the Cakes. Prose piece in Pickering Dialect, compared with Holderness, Nidderdale and Cornish Dialect versions. “Thou greeat doddthery bletherheead!”. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 8-9.

HARTLEY, JOHN – see Marsden, F.H., Two Essays on the Dialect of Upper Calderdale. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

HEPTONSTALL – see Marsden, F.H., Two Essays on the Dialect of Upper Calderdale. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

HOLDERNESS DIALECT. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 9-10.

HUDDERSFIELD DIALECT. 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 20-28; 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 33-37; 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 27-30.

Hyde, F. Austin, Depper, Awd Mare. Poem in dialect.
Hev I ony awd ’osses, young fellow frev ’Ull?
Thoo’s willin’ tae buy ’em? Gie value i’ full?
1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 31-32.

Hyde, F.A., Secretaries’ Report. “Professor E.V. Gordon’s masterly Paper on ‘The Vikings in Yorkshire’…Dialect, transcribed in nomic spelling, can only show approximate values…only by means of phonetics can the infinite shades and real values … be accurately transcribed” (and not always then! – Compiler). 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 5-7.

Jackson, Thos. C., A Chat about Holderness and the East Riding. “A lowly neighbour of mine ‘hoped that my children’s sleep would not be disturbed by his cows’ beeling’, using the Old Icelandic word belje meaning ‘to cry out’ or ‘bellow’.” 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 7-19.

Judson, H.I., Celtic Survivals in the Haworth District. Derives ‘Laycock’ from a “British” (sic) leacach, hill-side, and ‘Aden’ from a “British” (sic) aodann, the brow of a hill (highly doubtful – Compiler – aodann is in Dougal Buchanan’s [Scottish] Gaelic – English Dictionary, Lomond Books 1998). 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 26-27.

LAKELAND (CUMBERLAND) DIALECT LITERATURE. 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 20- 40.

List of Members:
1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 54-59.
1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 49-56.
1923 {Part XXIV Volume IV} pp 73-81 .
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 35-43.
1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 49-57.
1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 46-54.
1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 54-62.
1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 40-48.
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 44-52.
1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 35-43.

Marsden, F.H., Two Essays on the Dialect of Upper Calderdale:
I – The Folk-Lore of Calderdale. Childrens’ and other traditional local rhymes:
I’ Halifax ther’s bonny lasses –
I’ Heptonstall ther’s noan.
Pace Egg – old folk play of St. George. “The Calderdale version is exceptionally unsophisticated”. In reference to the “old-time costumes”, a local woman might say of someone colourfully dressed: “Shoo’s war nor a paysagger.”
II-Notes on the Grammar and Phonology of the Dialect. Early sources quoted: The Wakefield Court Rolls; Poll Tax Returns. temp. Richard II; Rental of Heptonstall 1439; Halifax Parish Registers 1538-93; Halifax Wills; Rev. John Watson’s account of Halifax dialect, 18th century; Two dialect letters in Crabtree’s History of Halifax 1836; John Hartley’s Clock Almanacs. Also notes on phonology &c. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

Mawer, Allen, Liverpool University, Letter to the Editor of Transactions encouraging readers to help document the local pronunciation of place-names for the Survey of English Place-Names. 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 57-58.

NIDDERDALE DIALECT. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 10-11.

NORTH SOMERSET DIALECT – see Perry, Francis C.

NORTHUMBERLAND DIALECTS – major article: see Orton, Harold, The Dialects of Northumberland. 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 14-25.

Orton, Harold, The Dialects of Northumberland. “Something…pleasing…in their vocalism…Unusual sentence-melodies…very musical rises and falls…” R.O.Heslop, “comprehensive” Glossary of Northumberland Words. Mentions work of A.J. Ellis in securing local data for his Early English Pronunciation (1889). Sentence concocted [about 1830] by someone near Wark to illustrate the quality of the vowel sounds: “I went to serve (feed) the calves, and it snowed and it blowed, and my feet balled (snow stuck to his boots) and ah! it was cold” Different phonetic transcriptions attempted for Redesdale and North Tyne. The distinctive Northumbrian “burr”- “consists in allowing the uvula – in place of the tip of the tongue, as in Lowland Scotch – to ‘flap’ quickly by the passage of the vocalised or unvocalised breath, thus making the rapid beats or interruptions which give rise to the sensation of trill.” (Ellis). But Heslop rejected the “trill theory”: it is a “uvular fricative” (!) – phonetic transcription as an upside-down capital R. “One never hears in the county the reduced form [t] of the definite article.” Also mention is made of the “strong Scandinavian element” despite the paucity of Norse place-names. 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 14-25.

Perry, Francis C., The Dialect of North Somerset. “s to z, f to v … does not apply to words of French origin …[hence] ‘cider’ not ‘zider’… r [is] reverted, i.e….with the tip of the tongue turned back against the roof of the mouth…People who have otherwise contrived to eliminate dialect from their speech are unable to get rid of this reversion (Note – This was also observed by the Compiler c.1978 presenting the written word “herbs” to a Bristolian) …The dialect (including that in King Lear) has done very heavy duty [for] the clownish element in Literature … Jennings, Observations on the Dialect of Somerset 1825.
I zeng o’ Mary Ramsey’s Crutch!
‘Thic little theng!’ – Why, ’tis’n much…
‘Pack ’em off to they colonies, wherever they be to’ (Compiler – Compare final “to” in ‘Wenglish’ speech of South Wales). 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 17-31.

PICKERING DIALECT. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 5-7; 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 8-9.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Cock-Leet. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition (Cock-leet = dawn).
Wheer t’ moortops are a-ringin’ wi’ t’ canty lilt o’ t’ lark.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} page 17.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Lyric. Poem in dialect.
Thoo’lt dream on a Dallow lark,
Singin’ ower moor an’ intake…
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 38.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, The Moorland Parson. Poem in dialect.
Aye, Parson died at cock-leet.
1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} pp 28-29.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Prayer for a Dale Village. Poem in dialect. 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} page 32.

Ratcliffe, Dorothy Una, Thoo! Poem in dialect. 1930 {Part XXXI Volume V} page 33.

REVERSED (WEST-COUNTRY) R – see Perry, Francis C.

RHYMING CHARTERS – see Witty, J.R. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 36-44.

RIPON RHYMING CHARTER – see Witty, J.R. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 36-44.

RIVER NAMES – see Gordon, E.V. & Smith A.H., The River Names of Yorkshire.

Roper, Nancy, A Tale abaht Taxes. Prose story in dialect. “Victor lewkt at ma, sudden an’ quick like. ‘You must write the actual truth, or you will be liable to a fine.’ ‘What!’ Ah sez, ‘dus ta meean ’at they’ll knaw when ahr lasses wor born when we don’t knaw wersen?’ ”. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 21-26.

Rowe, J. Hambley, Hardwicke, G., King Alfred and the Cakes. Prose piece in Cornish Dialect, compared with Pickering, Holderness, and Nidderdale Dialect versions. “Your wits is mewed and you avent any more mind than a quilkin, iss you’re totalish.” 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 11-12.

Rowe, Joseph Hambley, Dialect and the Doctor. The necessity for the medical practitioner to understand and use dialect. “Puke, to vomit, is in less general use, being recorded only north of Suffolk and Shropshire”(!) 1929 {Part XXX Volume V} pp 13-26.

ROXBURGHSHIRE DIALECT. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 27-28.

Shaw, Rev. Harry, To a Snowdrop. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
Who cud a thowt that tha’d a been
Wakken bi naah, an’ t’ wind ser keen!
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 15-16.

Smith, A.H. – see Gordon, E.V. & Smith A.H., The River Names of Yorkshire.

Smith, A.H., The Place-Names of North Yorkshire. “Common elements … worth is found only once in the North Riding …stow is not adduced at all… Ugglebarnby near Whitby is ‘the farm of (a man nicknamed) Ugl-barði. the owl-beard.’ … the lost wapentake of Dickering [referring also to E. Ekwall, English Place-names in Ing – Lund 1923]” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 7-19.

SOMERSET DIALECT – see Perry, Francis C.

Taylor, George, Book Review of: A New Glossary of the Dialect of the Huddersfield District, by Walter E. Haigh. “The author does not register the dialect pronunciation as accurately as he imagines … Professor Tolkien, in [his] foreword to this book [praises] its fulness … [but it is not] complete.” The review gives additional data on the dialect. 1928 {Part XXIX Volume V} pp 33-37.

Thwaite, J., What’s Farmin’. Poem in dialect, part of Dialect Competition.
An noo it’s gitten inta mi heead,
(It may be a fewlish noation,
Ah may be wrang, but Ah think Ah’s reet)
’At farmin’s perpetual moation.
1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} page 18.

TOLKIEN, J.R.R. – see Cowling, G.H. & Halliday, W.J., editors, Report for 1921, in 1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} page 5.

WAKEFIELD DIALECT SOURCE – see Marsden, F.H., Two Essays on the Dialect of Upper Calderdale. 1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 6-16.

Warriner, Frank, Some Dialect Poets of Cumberland. Poets mentioned:
1. Rev. Josiah Relph, born 1712. “Rustic Strephons tell of the artful rebuffs of rural Chloës.” Translation of the 19th Idyll of Theocritus.
2. Ewan Clark 1743-1811. Work compared with Scottish poet Allan Ramsay’s Tea Table Miscellany.
3. Charles Graham 1761-89, author of a pastoral dialogue Gwordy and Will.
4. Susannah Blamire 1747 – 1794, [also wrote in convincing Scots! – Susanna Blamire, The Muse of Cumberland, A Tribute, edited by Ted Relph, Lakeland Dialect Society 1994 - Compiler].
5. Mark Lonsdale, born 1758, author of The Upshot – “the most original poem which Cumberland has produced.” “Lonsdale, Stagg and Anderson … contemporary with Wordsworth, Southey [and] Scott … Almost all our [working-class dialect] poets have cast their eyes over the Border and have drawn inspiration from [Scotland’s] wealth of song.”
6. John Stagg, the Blind Bard, born 1770, his “masterpiece” the poem The Bridewain.
7. Robert Anderson, born 1770. “[His poetry] is shallow and thin in subject.”.
8. Alexander Craig Gibson, born 1813. Folk Speech of Cumberland 1869 criticises Wordsworth for not letting Betty Yewdale in his Excursion use her “oan mak’ o’ toke”.
9. John Richardson, born 1817, of Saint John’s Vale, gives us “the genuine Cumbrian” in Cummerland Talk.
10. Mary Powley, 1811-1883, famous for one song, The Brokken Statesman, and translated much from the Danish.
11. John Denwood and his brother Jonathan Denwood, early 20th century. “T’ Oald Clock was written to show that Cumberland speech … can convey pathos.”
1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 20- 40.

WENGLISH (English Dialect of South Wales Valleys) – Compiler’s note – see Perry, Francis C.

Witty, J.R., The Rhyming Charter of Beverley, generally called ‘Carta Regis Adelstani Ecclesiæ Sancti Johannis Beverlaci’.
(Probably c.1330)…I, the kinge Adelstan
Has yaten and given to seint Joh’n
Of Beverlik’, that sai I yow,
Tol and Theam …Sok and Sak’…
Quotes also from the Ripon Rhyming Charter, “more Northern in form” (early 16th century hand, but earlier composition):
And that the land of seint Wilfrai
Of alkyn geld fre sal be ay.
1921 {Part XXII Volume IV} pp 36-44.

Witty, J.R., The Beverley Plays. “This is to renew interest in the search for the original documents or for any subsequent copies of the Plays.” Kettell c. 1220 refers to acting a play of the Ascension in the churchyard, and youths climbing to the church clerestory to get a better view. Two sets of “Gilds” recorded in the Town Chartulary of Beverley: pageants/plays enacted at the Feast of Corpus Christi in June: different guilds in “Beverlac” were responsible for different parts of the Cycle: e.g. Tylers – the Fallinge of Lucifer, Goldsmyths – Kyngs of Colan (Magi), The Mylners – Rasynge of Lazar (Lazarus), Cooks – Haryinge of hell. Fragments given of some of the Plays, e.g. The Three Maries at the Sepulchre:
Allas! that we suche bale shuld bide
That sodayn sight so forto see!
The best techer in world wide
With nayles is tacched to a tre!
1922 {Part XXIII Volume IV} pp 18 – 42.

Witty, J.R., The Holderness Dialect in 1392. A 30-line protest rhyme composed by John Berwald of Cotyngham, and others, and recited in Beverley on July 21, 1392:
And yet will ilkan held up other,
And meynten him als his brother,
Bothe in wrang and right.
1923 {Part XXIV Volume IV} pp 68-71.

Witty, J.R., King Alfred and the Cakes. Prose piece in Holderness Dialect, compared with Pickering, Nidderdale and Cornish Dialect versions. “Thoo girt fond-eead, thoo’s as soft as a boiled tonnup… Thoo owt ti be shammed of thisen.”. 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 9-10.

Witty, J.R., Yorkshire Dialect 1810. Copy of a letter of invitation to the 14th Meeting of the Yorkshire Society in London: “Intoh ole shaps, maks and forms that I cud rap, reave, turn, twist er twine wer manner ov tokin int’ Weapentack I cuz frah…” 1926 {Part XXVII Volume IV} pp 43-44.

Witty, J.R., Sheep and Sheep-Scoring. Remarks on the sheep industry: many examples of “corrupt” and other systems of counting sheep, compares languages, and establishes “that we can safely state that they are not Anglian but Celtic [i.e. Welsh] survivals.” (Compiler – We cannot brand them as “survivals” without continuous historical evidence. Welsh is not a dead language, and speakers of Welsh, including shepherds, are not immobile). 1927 {Part XXVIII Volume IV} pp 41-49.

WRIGHT, JOSEPH – see 1925 {Part XXVI Volume IV} pp 46-47.

Yorke, Miss M.A., King Alfred and the Cakes. Prose piece in Nidderdale Dialect, compared with Pickering, Holderness, and Cornish Dialect versions. “Thoo girt dunderhead! Thoo’s nowt bud a fooil.” 1924 {Part XXV Volume IV} pp 10-11.

Yorke, M.A., Nidderdale. Poem in dialect.
Lile bonny becks o’ Nidderdale…
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 39.

Yorke, M.A., T’ Moor-Edge. Poem in dialect.
It’s dree ti walk up Greenhow by ma-sen…
1929 {Part XXX Volume V} page 40.

ZUMERZET (SOMERSET) DIALECT – see Perry, Francis C.

Visit our Facebook page

Follow us on Twitter